Bessie May Moore1

F, ID# 11221, (a 1915 - )
     Bessie May Moore was born a 1915. She married William Floyd Weathers, son of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1935.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Felton Pitts1

M, ID# 11222, (a 1911 - )
     Felton Pitts was born a 1911. He married Allean Weathers, daughter of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1934.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Clarence Hamm1

M, ID# 11223, (a 1916 - )
     Clarence Hamm was born a 1916. He married Maple Weathers, daughter of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1941.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Unknown Clark1

M, ID# 11224
     Unknown Clark married Magdalene Weathers, daughter of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1945.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Andy Lauer1

M, ID# 11225, (a 1911 - )
     Andy Lauer was born a 1911. He married Polly Weathers, daughter of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1936.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Lucy Cook1

F, ID# 11226
     Lucy Cook married Paul "Pete" Weathers, son of Thomas 'Tom' Floyd Weathers and Ethel Nalls, a 1944.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Lula Morris1

F, ID# 11227, (6 Aug 1900 - 5 Jul 1998)
     Lula Morris was born on 6 Aug 1900 at Alabama. She married Hosea "Oce" Daniel Weathers, son of Hiram Floyd Weathers and Sarah Alabama "Bama" Crawford, a 1915. Lula Morris died on 5 Jul 1998 at age 97.

Child of Lula Morris and Hosea "Oce" Daniel Weathers

Citations

  1. [S10] Unsourced Data.

Oscar Shaw1

M, ID# 11228, (a 1897 - )
     Oscar Shaw was born a 1897. He married Mae Weathers, daughter of Hiram Floyd Weathers and Sarah Alabama "Bama" Crawford, a 1919.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Willie Shaw1

M, ID# 11229, (a 1907 - )
     Willie Shaw was born a 1907. He married Myrtle Weathers, daughter of Hiram Floyd Weathers and Sarah Alabama "Bama" Crawford, a 1932.

Child of Willie Shaw and Myrtle Weathers

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Birdie (Unknown)1

F, ID# 11230, (a 1909 - )
     Birdie (Unknown) was born a 1909. She married Claude Temple Weathers, son of Hiram Floyd Weathers and Sarah Alabama "Bama" Crawford, a 1929.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Annie (Unknown)1

F, ID# 11231, (a 1912 - )
     Annie (Unknown) was born a 1912. She married David H. Weathers, son of Hiram Floyd Weathers and Sarah Alabama "Bama" Crawford, a 1932.

Citations

  1. [S210] Ludie Mae Weathers Grantham (b. 1945), Weathers Family.

Charlsey E. Tarrant1

F, ID# 11232, (20 Jul 1847 - 12 Mar 1926)
     Charlsey E. Tarrant was born on 20 Jul 1847. She married Wade Simpson Glenn, son of James Glenn II and Olive "Ollie" Richards, c 1865. Charlsey E. Tarrant died on 12 Mar 1926 at age 78.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Elizabeth "Eliza" Glenn1,2

F, ID# 11233, (c 1828 - )
Father:William "Billy" Marion Glenn I (11 Nov 1806 - 14 Nov 1895)
Mother:Jane McCullough (11 Sep 1811 - Apr 1879)
     Elizabeth "Eliza" Glenn was born c 1828 at Abbeville Co, South Carolina. She was the daughter of William "Billy" Marion Glenn I and Jane McCullough.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.
  2. [S575] Marilyn Szum Research.

James "Jim" Randolph Glenn1

M, ID# 11234, (c 1850 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     James "Jim" Randolph Glenn was born c 1850 at Alabama. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

John B. Glenn1

M, ID# 11235, (c 1852 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     John B. Glenn was born c 1852 at Alabama. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Amanda Olivia Glenn1

F, ID# 11236, (c 1854 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Amanda Olivia Glenn was born c 1854 at Alabama. She was the daughter of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Thomas "Tom" W. Glenn1

M, ID# 11237, (c 1856 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Thomas "Tom" W. Glenn was born c 1856 at Alabama. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Mary "Mollie" C. Glenn1

F, ID# 11238, (c 1859 - b Mar 1883)
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Mary "Mollie" C. Glenn was born c 1859 at Alabama. She was the daughter of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford. Mary "Mollie" C. Glenn died b Mar 1883.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Marion Allen Glenn1

M, ID# 11239, (c 1864 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Marion Allen Glenn was born c 1864 at Alabama. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Peter Edward "Ed" Glenn1

M, ID# 11240, (c 1866 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Peter Edward "Ed" Glenn was born c 1866 at Alabama. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Francis "Frank" R. Glenn1

M, ID# 11241, (c 1869 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Francis "Frank" R. Glenn was born c 1869 at Texas. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Walter Columbus "Lum" Glenn1

M, ID# 11242, (c 1873 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Walter Columbus "Lum" Glenn was born c 1873 at Texas. He was the son of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Martha "Mattie" O. Glenn1

F, ID# 11243, (4 Aug 1875 - )
Father:Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn (5 Mar 1826 - 20 Mar 1894)
Mother:Martha Charlotte Bradford (18 Jan 1833 - 12 Feb 1883)
     Martha "Mattie" O. Glenn was born on 4 Aug 1875 at Cleburne, Texas. She was the daughter of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford. Martha "Mattie" O. Glenn married Ben Earp on 30 Nov 1901 at El Paso, Texas.
      James Allen Glenn's Story by his daughter Martha Glenn Earp, Feb 1954
"I'll begin as far back as I can remember, with minor details, plain and simple, leading up to that which seemed to me, few exciting experiences. I had many happy, and some exciting hours. I shall not go into too much detail lest my story becomes boresome. Why do I write this? Because I would have liked so much to have the story of my mother's life as she lived it.

My father, James Allen Glenn, told me much of his early life. He said that they moved from Mobile, Alabama, where he had a large warehouse, to Cleburn, Johnson County, Texas, passing through Fort Worth, which at that time, consisted only of a fort and a few scattered houses. He was bringing with him a large herd of oxen. For these oxen, a land owner offered my father a large tract of acreage; then, land was cheap and oxen were valuable. But Father knew the goal he wanted to reach and refused to make the trade. He said that had he made that deal, he would have owned all other land upon which Fort Worth is now located. (Note: Some of this account is most likely factual, but in the 1860 census report, the James Glenn family was living in Cherokee County, Alabama. In the 1870 census, they were located in Collin County which is about seventy miles, as the crow flies, NE of Johnson County. In the 1880 census, they were located in Palo Pinto County. Mattie was born in 1875, so they evidently moved to Johnson County after living in Collin County. My guess is that he sold the oxen in Dallas and settled in Collin County which is in the area and did farm work. RBS)

My parents at that time had nine children. I was born later at Cleburn on August 4, 1875. When I was five months old, in January of 1876, Father moved to Palo Pinto County, near a very small town, Santo. He bought much land and cattle and set up what is now called a stock farm. My two oldest brothers, Jim and Tom, were married before I was born, and so were my two sisters, Amanda (Mrs. West) and Mollie (Mrs. Littlefield, the town of Littlefield in West Texas was named for her husband.) Brother Jim lived at Gordon, above Santo, and the others lived not far away at points in Palo Pinto County.

Father had three sons old enough to manage the stock and the farm, with the help of a hired man. I don't remember the hired man's name, but I do recall that once he asked me to watch his horse for a few minutes. I lay down close to the edge of an open-top well and went to sleep. I have a faint memory of how frightened my mother was.

Once, too, there was an old bachelor who lived with us. His name was Jess Stroud, and we called him "Uncle Stroud." He helped around the place.

My father was a Baptist Evangelist, and I cannot remember his being at home very much; he traveled by horseback and by buggy to his camp meetings. In later years, his health failed, because of rheumatism, so when he heard of the new health resort, which was beginning to be established, where there was such wonderful mineral water, he went and spent a while there. He must have improved, for he sent for my mother, and of course for me, since I was the baby girl in the family. I suppose he wanted to see if Mother would like to live at the health resort, which is now Mineral Wells, Texas, for shortly afterward, he sold the stock and the land at Santo. As we were going to the health resort, we traveled in a two seated hack. Another hack undertook to pass us and a race began. My mother was thrown from the seat, but I think she was not seriously hurt.

At Millsap, hacks met the trains to take the people to Mineral Wells. These trains were always loaded with so many people they reminded you of geese going south in the winter season. When we went there, I remember the place where we stopped for room and board. It was a long lean-to covered with canvas. From this occasion, I have no memory of going back home, for of course Mother approved of the change. After the sale of everything at Santo, Father had a house built at the foot of the West Mountain. Our household goods were moved to our new place by wagons. The only part of that trip that I remember is that we were passing by some houses or through a small town and we children saw some Negro children playing . We had never seen Negros before, and my brother Frank asked Father to buy one of them for a pet.

After we were settled in our new home, Mother had a Negro cook. I remember I didn't want to eat her cooking for fear the black would come off in the food. We had a long dining table and they kept a plate of bread at each end. I well remember asking Mother which plate of bread she cooked, and of course she showed me the one next to me.

As to our family, ours was a happy one. My younger sister, Mollie, was a widow, and my father built her a house on one corner of the block ours was on.

While the town was growing so fast, I recall it all so well. I can still hear the constant noise of well machines, saws, and hammers. If you ever lived in a town springing up almost over night, you know what I mean. People were living in shacks and tents, while their houses were being built. One family, I remember, was that of Mr. Haynes, the postmaster. Unfortunately, Mrs. Haynes had lost her mind and was treated by having her drink mineral water. Because of this or some other measure, she became well again. The well was called Crazy Well, and I suppose it still bears that name, after seventy two years! Next, the Gibson Well was the one to become popular, and I suppose it still goes by that name.

We had been living in Mineral Wells when my sister, Mollie, passed away. Shortly after that, Mother took pneumonia and we lost her. I was about seven, and brother Lum (Walter) was about ten. We were very lonely without her and spent much time with Father in the store he had recently bought. In those days he had a housekeeper a part of the time. When there was no housekeeper, there were many lonely hours at home, until a doctor came with his invalid wife and small son to live in Sister Mollie's house. The wife didn't want to drink the mineral water, so she had me to bring her fresh water from the water barrels. I was glad to do it, and did so until her husband caught up with us. He was there one day when she asked me to get her a bucket of water. He forbade me to do it any more, then she started toward me, saying "I'll kill her if she doesn't." The doctor caught his wife and dragged her into the house, and it was then that I realized that she was just plain crazy. After that, I stayed in the store with my daddy.

When my mother went away from us, I gave my love I had for her to my father; I really worshipped him. Somewhat more that a year after Mother's death, Father met a fine, good lady who became our stepmother. She was a Mrs. Robinson, and she had a son, John, who was about the age of brother Lum. My stepmother was very good and kind to me a seemed to love me as her own. At that time, I had four single brothers, Marion, Ed, Frank, and Lum. The three eldest were away from home working. I was happy and was very fond of my stepmother, but I had given all my love to my father. I shall tell you more of this later in my story.

Father still held camp meetings, and my stepmother and I would go with him. He preached under big brush arbors. Almost everybody that came brought food and spread it together on a long narrow table under the oak trees. Life went on as usual. At night, before retiring, Father would read the Bible to us, and then he held prayers.

My brother, Lum, and my stepbrother, John left home at about the age of eighteen to work. As I remember, brother Lum went to our eldest brother, Jim, and worked for him on the farm, and I think my stepbrother, John, went to the home of his sister, Rena, in Ft. Worth. I suppose I worked, too. Now, there were just we three at home, Father, our stepmother, and me.

We had a large rock school building, and I remember that a prize was offered to the one in our geography class that could draw the best map of the United States. The location of each state, the main rivers, and the mountains. We had only one week to study and make the drawing, but I won the prize. The teacher let it remain on the board for a long time. Later, when I went off to the Palo Pinto Academy to school, I had to do a lot of drawing on the blackboard, especially for our physiology class. The most difficult drawing I remember, was a life-size skeleton.

It was while I was attending the Academy, that Father took ill. The seriousness of it was kept from me, and I believed that by my constant praying, God would heal him. One day one of my brothers came for me, and said, "Let's go Father, he is worse." Oh, what a shock! It seemed the whole world had slipped from under me. I still had hopes that my prayers would be heard, and my every breath was a breath of prayer while we were on our way to him. When I walked into his room, he smiled and took me in his precious arms. I lived by his bedside. It seemed I couldn't love and pet him enough. I never had the least doubt in my mind but that God would heal him. When I did leave his bedside, it was to go to my room, and on my bended knees bed God to heal my daddy. They had to force me to eat and sleep. For fourteen days, I sat by him until forced away. Then, on my bended knees, I implored God not to let my father die. As I remember, my every prayer was a selfish one, never one for myself. I must have thought I was sinless. Reared by Bible reading , prayers, and going to church, it never entered my head other than that I was a Christian, and that God would hear my prayers, "Selfish Prayers." One morning, I had gone into the kitchen with my niece, Pearl Glenn, and I was happy, feeling that Father was better. My eldest brother, Jim, walked in, and said, "Sister, Father is dying." I rushed to his bedside; the whole world had grown, oh, so dark. In those few moments everything in me left his bedside, I grew, oh, so bitter toward God! I said in my heart, "God, I hate you, and never again will I pray to you. I went home with brother Jim after the funeral, and our stepmother went with her daughter, Rena, to Fort Worth. I grieved till my brothers were uneasy about me, and I cannot remember how long I lived in that awful state.......in that world of darkness and gloom without God. Happily, however, and not too late, there came an awakening without any effort on my part. Not knowing why or where I was going, I arose from my bed in the small hours of the night, walked blindly to the edge of a large yard, knelt down, and began to pray. Still, I felt that God was far from me. I laid my face in the dirt. I can never describe what I went through; how long I prayed, I can't remember, bondage of the awful sin I had committed in rebelling against Him. I realized that I had never really known God; when I arose I was living in a new world and felt the glorius light from God shining in my heart and soul. I was comforted. I began reading the Bible and praying as I had never prayed before. The cloud of grief had been lifted.

Our stepmother would never come back to live in our home, so I had no one certain home, just here and there with my married brothers, but I was happy. After a few years I went to stay for a while with brother, Lum, in Kent, out in West Texas. It was there that I met Ben Earp of Newark, Texas, the man I married."

TRANSCRIBED FROM A COPY OF THE ORIGINAL BY DESCENDANT ROBERT BOYD SMITH, 2005.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Ben Earp1

M, ID# 11244, (a 1871 - )
     Ben Earp was born a 1871. He married Martha "Mattie" O. Glenn, daughter of Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn and Martha Charlotte Bradford, on 30 Nov 1901 at El Paso, Texas.

Citations

  1. [S392] James Glenn Family Records.

Unknown Robinson

F, ID# 11245, (a 1836 - )
     Unknown Robinson was born a 1836. She married Pvt. and Rev. James Allen Glenn, son of James Glenn II and Olive "Ollie" Richards, c 1884.

John Glenn I1,2,3

M, ID# 11246, (1728 - a 18 Mar 1787)
Charts:Amanda Ola Weathers lineage
     John Glenn I was born in 1728 at Co Antrim, Ireland. He married Rosanna (Unknown) c 1764 at Ireland. John Glenn I immigrated in 1768 to Charleston, South Carolina. He died a 18 Mar 1787 at District 96, Newberry Co, South Carolina. His estate was probated on 3 Sep 1787 at Newberry Co, South Carolina.
      John Glenn immigrated in 1768 to Charleston, SC from Belfast, Ireland on the brig Lord Dungannon. The proof that John was this particular immigrant was the bounty land he was awarded on arrival which was later inherited by his sons and subsequently became the subject of a court case wherein his children and grandchildren, including our ancestor Rosanna, were named. This court case differentiates our John Glenn from the many other men in the Carolinas with the same name during his lifetime. John was noted on records by the names Glen, Glenn, Glyn and Glynn.

In 1761 the South Carolina Assembly established a profit sharing arrangement with shipping firms wherein the goverment paid ship owners four pounds sterling for every poor protestant brought to South Carolina, and the ship owners in turn petitioned for bounty land on behalf of the arriving settlers. Those who emigrated to America usually did so because the cost of owning or renting a home was unreasonable for the average Irish family, but they also had to prove they were religious refugees by obtaining a certificate showing they were protestants. For many their only hope was to go to America, accepting the bounty land for settling in the back country. The provincial Council in Charleston not only gave 100 acres to the head of the family, but 50 acres for any child over the age of seven and also a wagon, a horse or mule, and food and tools sufficient to make a start on creating a home. Our Glenn family was the only one by that surname who took advantage of this opportunity during the time land was provided. Records of the immigrants and which ports they departed from were kept by the South Carolina provincial government during the time the land bounty was paid which ended in Jul 1768 once upper South Carolina was well populated.

A 19 Aug 1767 newspaper advertisement noted: "For Charlestown in South-Carolina, The Brig Lord Dungannon, Robert Montgommery [Montgomery], Master, two hundred Tons Berthen, will be clear to sail from this Port against the 10th of October next. Such as incline to embrace this favourable Opportunity of being agreeably conveyed to a fine Country are requested immediately to apply to Campbell and Donaldson's James Henderson, James Park, and John Gregg, either of whom will agree with them. She is a fine vessel and not Ten months old, the Captain well acquainted in the Passenger Trade, as he served his time under his cousin Captain John Montgommery [Montgomery] of Larne, who is well known to have made as many good Passages as any Master from Ireland; besides the owners are determined not to engage more Passengers than she with ease can accomodate, and to spare no expense in laying in Plenty of the best of Provisions of every kind. Should any choose to pay their Passage here and claim their Bounty at the other side, they will be agreed with on easy Terms. Belfast, 19th August 1767. N.B. The above vessel is just arrived from Antigua." Details noting limiting the number of passengers and generous provisions were included to address the fears generated by a different company overcrowding a ship with people and inadequate provisions the year before.

A subsequent newspaper notice stated "The Passengers who have engaged to go to Charleston in the Brig Lord Dungannon are desired to take notice that she will be clear to sail against the Time appointed, or at furthest on Monday the 12th Instant. She wants about thirty of her Complement, but that will not detain her a day after She is clear, and those who offer first will be preferred. With respect to such as shall not appear to fulfil their Engagements by the 12th Instant at farthest, the Owners will not look upon themselves as any longer under promise to secure their Berths in the said Vessels. October 5, 1767."

Charleston, SC had strong ties to the ship's master, merchant John Montgomery, who owned several ships that made annual trips from the port of Larne, Ireland. Many of these trips involved clergy bringing constiuents to settle in the Carolinas at the request of Charleston.

In South Carolina King's Creek Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church was founded in 1772 by the Rev. John Renwick, a Scots-Irish Seceder from County Antrim, Ireland. The nucleus of the first congregation was composed of Renwick's parishioners from Ireland, most of whom came to South Carolina in 1767, 1770 and 1772. One theory is the Glenns traveled to America with their congregation, but a list of the congregation in Ireland needs to be found to check that assumption. Other early settlers of Newberry County, regardless of their denomination, also worshiped in the congregations of King's Creek and Cannon Creek.

Arriving in Charleston right before John on the snow "James and Mary" were a number of families from Larne, Ireland who were likely important to and possibly related to the Glenns, given that John's mother was reportedly a Caldwell and John Glenn used Douglasses and McLenens for his will. A 12 Jan 1768 Council meeting awarded the extended Caldwell and Douglass immigrant families 700 and 400 acres respectively and the McCleland family 150 acres.

The ship the settlers sailed on customarily determined what area of Ulster they were from because ship owners commonly appointed agents to sell passage on their ships, and the agents routinely recruited passengers from one area. So most of the passengers on a ship came from the same town.

The Lord Dungannon departed from Belfast and Larne with 139 passengers and arrived on 13 Feb 1768 in Charleston, SC with 141, including John Glenn and his family. Passengers from Larne probably came from north County Antrim. The original manifest reportedly did not list the town where most people were from per se but noted they were from Antrim, which could mean they were from Belfast which was in County Antrim, or it could mean they were from the Town of Antrim in County Antrim.

The Council Meeting Journal on 13 Feb 1768 contained, "the following petitions for Warrants of Survey on the Bounty" in Granville or Craven County after which among the names listed was John Glenn for 200 acres. This entry was followed by "Ordered that the Secretary do prepare Warrants of Survey accordingly. The following persons presented petitions to his Excellency the Governor setting forth that they were protestants and arrived in this province in the Brig Lord Dunagannon, Robert Montgomery, Master, on the encouragement and Bounty given by the Act of the General Assembly of this Provence passed the 25th July 1761 and therefore prayed to be allowed the same. That the prayers of their petitions were granted and the public Treasurer was ordered to pay the Bountys of four pounds and two pounds sterling according to their respective ages in consideration of their passages to this Province to Messrs Torrans and Ponag in behalf of the owners of the said Brig and the remaining twenty shillings sterling to themselves agreeable to the directions of the said Act." After this declaration among the names listed were John Glen age 40, Rose Glen age 30 and Jane Glen age 3.

John reportedly had a 13-year old son who came to America, but the son was not on the same ship as John Glen and he was not accounted for in John's will, although he could have been deceased by that time. Given John's age when he married Rosannah, she was possibly his second wife and was reported in the research of W. T. Glenn as such. However, this 13 year-old Glenn could have been another relative or not even related.

When South Carolina established counties, Berkeley and adjacent Craven county boundaries were never surveyed and were quite fluid, thus John's land was intially noted as being in Berkeley and later in Craven. The chain of title for John's land grant proves his descendants. The grant was for 200 acres -- 100 each awarded for he and his wife -- on Rocky Branch which was a tributary on the north side of the Saluda River in Berkeley Co, later called Newberry Co, SC. The Rocky Branch waterway is key in determining the location and is not to be confused with either Little Rocky Creek or Rocky Creek nearby on the south side of the Saluda or Rocky Branch and Rock Creek which flowed into the Broad River in Chester District near where the Enoree River joined the Broad River. John's land was surveyed 13 Feb 1768, and the plat completed by surveyor John Caldwell on 9 Mar 1768 showed John's acreage surrounded by vacant land and the 2 foot wide and 6 inch deep Rocky Branch bisecting the property north to south. John's grant was issued 6 Dec 1768, and the memorial, perhaps some form of recording or tax, was issued 28 Feb 1769.

On a deep bend of the Saluda River, John's land was a distinctive site which later was incorporated into Newberry District. Soon his surrounding landowners were John Attenger by 1771, William and James Stuart before 1774, and Susanna Wade on the east side by 1774, as well as Hugh Gragg had an 1785 unrecorded plat for 60 acres not granted. After John's death and the inheritance of this land by his sons, by the time the detailed 1820 Newberry District survey was done, the Glenn neighbors on nearby main roads were Coate, Edwards and Higgins; the Glenn home(s) was not shown likely because it was off the main roads. Modern descriptions of the Saluda watershed noted Rock Branch feeds the middle Saluda River which in turn feeds the South Saluda River.

Another 200 acres on Big Creek and the north side of the Saluda River about five miles from John Glenn's patent was granted to John Glen/n in Craven Co, SC. The land was platted 22 Jul 1774, granted 10 Feb 1775 and memorialized 11 Jul 1775. This 200 acre plat was surrounded by vacant land, bisected west to east by Big Creek, and was located about 9.5 miles down the Saluda River from John Glenn's plat at Rocky Branch. By 1820 the land was included in the Newberry District survey and by 2005 the land was likely under Lake Murray.

Noted researcher Leonardo Anrea stated this second 200 acres was for an increase in John's family ... of four or more children under the age of sixteen. This researcher has not noted land being given for family increases. Four additional children could have included the 13 year-old, Margaret, James and an unknown child likely born 1773 presumed because of the gap in births that year who later died and thus whose name remains unknown. Otherwise John could not hav met the four-person threshold because daughter Jane was already accounted for in the first 200 acre allotment and his son John was likely born in 1775.

Although our John Glenn's family increase must have met the requirement, there was no indication the Big Creek land, if it belonged to our John Glenn, stayed with him for long. No land grants were awarded on Big Creek up through 1840 noting the land was adjacent to the land of a Glenn, nor did any wills of people living on Big Creek mention they purchased or owned land adjacent to the Glenns. No record yet found showed John selling, gifting or bequeathing the land during his lifetime. John's will only noted he owned 200 acres and was to receive 100 acres from William Harbison's widow for a total of 300 acres. Thus, the Big Creek land could have been granted to our John Glenn and then immediately sold before the surrounding vacant land was patented.

Descendant Maryann Cavender Hood stated in Apr 1988 that John's brothers were Col David Glyn and William Glynn of Glynn Co, GA but provided no proof and may have been repeating an oft-told tradition. Col. David Glenn (1744-1784) was often said to be the brother of John. David reportedly came from Northern Ireland to Savannah, GA in 1774 expecting to join family in the now Glynn Co, GA area; reportedly his father also came to the area of Glynn Co, GA. Instead of settling in Glynn Co, David bought a plantation on the Enoree River which runs parallel with the Saluda River about 25 miles to its north; settled in Newberry District; and died in Jun 1784 in Savannah leaving a widow Rosanna Thompson(?) and 4 small children: David Glyn, Col John Glyn, Dr. George W. Glyn, and a daughter who married Col John Rogers. In the 1790 census Rosanna was shown as widow Rosy Glenn with 2 sons under 16, 1 daughter and 3 slaves and in 1800 she was lised as age 26-46 with two sons age 16-26. This second Rosanna was much younger than her same-named possible sister-in-law, the widow of John Glenn, and died in Newberry Co, SC testate naming her children.

John Glenn is most likely the man who both served in the militia during the Revolutionary War as well as the John Glenn who provided material assistance to the American forces, thus according to book Southern Colonial Families the record and source citation of his and his wife's claim dated 21 Jun 1781, Feb 1782, and 5 Jun 1791 provide eligibility for DAR/SAR membership for proven discendants. John's pay records were filed together with his claims for provisioning forces and with his widow's claim for payment, indicating South Carolina believed the militia pay and the claims for provisioning were for the same John Glenn.

Despite being 54 years old, John was most likely the John Glen who served as a private under Capt. James Dillard in the Little River District Regiment of Militia during the Revolution. Maps show Rocky Branch on which John lived and the Little River where the militia was formed both join the north side of the Saluda River about one-half mile apart at the Newberry - Saluda counties' border. The pay records for Capt Jas Dillard's Company of Rangers under the command of Col Livy Casey's Regiment for 24 Apr - 8 Jun 1782 include pay for John Glen for 45 days service at 20 s(hillings?) ... 45.

In regard to provisioning the forces, John Glyn submitted a Revolutionary War claim on 13 Jun 1785 for provisions and forage furnished in 1781-1782 to the SC Militia to include 100 sheaves of oats on 21 Jun 1781 for which he had a receipt for 4 pounds, 1 shilling. John also provided rations and forage for 12 men and horses overnight and morning in Feb 1782 receipted by Col Richard Hampton and LTC Jerrard Smith for 9 pounds, 15 shillings and 9 pence, and certified by Col Robert Anderson in Jul 1783.

Apparently John was paid for the provisioning with two bonds issued at the same time and due with interest later. On 18 Jun 1785 the South Carolina Commissioners of the Treasury delivered to John Glenn an indented certificate for 65 pounds sterling for Militia duty as a private since the reduction of Charleston per account audited ... the said John Glenn will be entitled to receive 4 pounds 11 shillings for one year's interest and the principal sum of 65 pounds on 18 Jun 1787. Thus it appeared John had a government financial certificate similar to a present-day bond. Two years later on the reverse side of the certificate John signed with his mark, an X, a receipt dated 18 Mar 1787 for three years interest on the within.... Witness Thomas Nicholls. John then by his mark signed over the within indent for the third year to Robert Beatty.... Robert Beatty on 13 Jun 1788 signed a receipt for interest to 1 Apr last, likely 1788, and also in full satisfaction for the within in a new indent... So apparently Beatty took an additional year of interest. (#48, Book C, I.) John's 18 Mar 1787 signature combined with his 3 Sep 1787 probate narrowed his death date.

Also on 18 Jun 1785 the South Carolina Commissioners of the Treasury delivered to John Glenn an indented certificate for 8 pounds sterling for Militia duty as a private since the reduction of Charleston per account audited, and John was to receive 11 shillings 2 pence for one year's interest. On the reverse side of the certificate John signed a receipt dated 26 _?_ 1786 for three years' interest of 1 pound, 13 shillings, 6 d (dollars were first used in 1785) and then signed all his rights and title to the within to Jacob Juark or Ruark and Company. Witness Barnet Moses who assigned his right and title to Phillip Hart....

The 1988 note from Maryann Cavender Hood also referred to John's Revolutionary War "paper" dated 10 Mar 1787, which was a week before John signed the reverse side of the indent certificate on 18 Mar 1787, so the 10 Mar 1787 paper is possibly related to the certificate. Hood also mentioned his wife Rosannah filing 5 Jun 1791 Revolutionary War "papers," thus likely related to her second estate accounting.

In the second accounting dated 5 Jun 1791 for John's estate, his widow Roseannah asked Thomas Waters to collect the payments due her late husband for his service and for provisions furnished during the Revolutionary War, the latter to be collected by Mercer Babb for Mrs. Rosannah Glen, widow of John Glyn. Thus, Rosannah as administrator of John Glenn, deceased, submitted an accounts payable note for John Glenn for service to the Commissioner of the South Carolina Treasury. The note was annotated on the reverse: Received Columbia, (SC), 7 Jan 1791 from Commr Treas. Indent No. 3276, Book X for two pds. and eight pence in full for the within (signed) Mercer & Babb.

All primary records show John Glenn with no middle name. John was thought to be named John O. Glenn, but noted researchers Leonardo Andreas who did Glenn research in the early 1900s and David Avant whose work was in the 1980s stated John O. Glenn was incorrect and the 'O' was clearly noted as his mark on his will. Puzzling is why John signed some of his later-life military-related documents with his signature and some with his mark, and because records prior to those did not require his signature, no records provide a comparison. Possibly John injured his arm or hand or suffered from arthritis. The South Carolina Treasury believed the signatures and marks to be from the same man and thus filed the documents together.

John Glen [sic] in his 20 Sep 1784 will, acknowledged he was living near the Saluda River in the 96th District of South Carolina. John willed 100 acres each to his three sons John, James and William. The original 200 acre tract where John senior resided was divided between sons John and James and can be tracted through subsequent wills and land transactions, and his son William received 100 acres unrelated to the original land grant which John Glenn had purchased from "my Brother Wm. Herbison, deceased, the same not released yet but promised by Ann Herbison his Widow...." In John Glenn's will, sons James and John received a horse each and daughters Gean, Margaret, Mary and Ann Glen were given 2 cows and a horse or colt each. John left his plantation, tools and household goods to his wife. John Douglass and Thomas Brown were executors and witnesses were Robert Speer, James Douglass and James McLenen. Ann was presumed to be his daughter Rosanna, and his children's approximate birth dates were based on their order in his will.

The Herbison land referred to in John's will was likely part of the 150-acre patent on the Saluda River in Berkeley Co, SC to platted for William Harbison and administered to him between 26 Feb 1772 and 23 Dec 1774. The term "brother" had a quite different meaning in the 1700s. William may have been John's brother-in-law having married a sister of John or of his wife, a cousin, a step or half brother, or a religous brother. The language of the will was such that it is less likely William Harbison was married to John's sister, otherwise John would more plausibly have stated 'my sister Ann Herbison.' Harbisons and the interrelated Carsons owned land throughout the area.

On 18 Jan 1809 Matthew Harbison of Chester District, SC stated in court that John Glen of Newberry District had purchased 108 acres, which was part of a tract originally granted William Harbyson in Newberry Co adjacent to the land of Rogers, Francis Higgan, and to Glen land on the northwest. Matthew signed over all rights to the land to the John Glen heirs and Ann Harbison signed as the wife of Matthew; thus there were likely two or more Anns in this part of the Harbison family, married to both the father and the son.

Before 5 Jun 1791 Rosannah Glen, as administrator of the Estate and Will of her deceased husband John Glen... came before Philomen Waters, Justice of the Peace of Newberry District (no date). Rosannah's 5 Jun 1791 accounting dealt with John's military-related entitlements.

Many John Glenns resided in South Carolina. Before John arrived in South Carolina in 1768, there were John Glens frequently noted from 1735 to 1755 in deeds, lawsuits and leases and one served as governor in 1753 generating innumerable records. Any land transactions before John's arrival in America on 13 Feb 1768 were clearly for other men with the same name. During the time our John was living in South Carolina from 1768 - 1787 at least a dozen court records were rendered involving men by the name of John Glen or Glenn, however nothing specifically indicates any of these cases involved our ancestor. Another John Glenn senior and junior resided in the area and were shown in 1771 records, and a John and William Glen were in 1781-1782 records, but these men were too old to be our John's sons by those names who were still children at that time. By 1782 a John Glenn, apparently residing in GA but whose wife Sarah Jones with six small children had ties to South Carolina, noted he was banished from the US as a traitor; this may be the same John Glen who along with a William Glenn senior were noted as loyalists and were fined a percentage of their estates in 1787. In 1785 a John Glenn acquired 360 acres in St James Goose Creek Parish, Charleston District. Without further data, other records for judgments, deeds and claims cannot be apportioned to any particular John Glenn, but none of these actions appeared to involve our John Glenn.

Pundits in the early to mid 1900s era of hobby-genealogy aggressively aligned the genealogy American families with proven illustrious family lines in Europe with the same surname without there being any valid connections or supporting research. Many of these stories were republished and took on a life of their own. There appears to be a push to align our Glenns in South Carolina with Glenns of wealth from Inch-Martin, Banff, Scotland and Kirkcudbright, Sutherland, Scotland who went to Lifford, Ireland circa 1600 and in their own right can be traced back to the 1200s. It is impossible to confim descent from any Glenn line because our immigrant John's father is unknown.

According to an Apr 1988 note from Maryann Cavender Hood, a Glenn descendant living in Gadsden, AL, John and Rosannah Glenn "migrated from Lith In., Scotland to Antrim, Northern Ireland and then to SC." However, no data supports John and Rosannah living in Scotland. The source of information supporting this reported connection to "Lith Inh is unknown, However two similarly named places were found -- one in Scotland and one in Northern Ireland near where John likely was born.

The Glenn connection to Lith In -- if it existed -- could have been to John's ancestors if it was to Scotland because John is believed to have been born in Ireland. "Lith In" may refer to Leith, Scotland on the Firth of Forth, which historically served as the Edinburgh port. The Islands of the Forth include 12 small islands, many with the first element "Inch-" from Innis, the Gaelic word for island, as part of their names. Only Inchcolm had a resident population in recent years, although there have been monasteries, hermitages, lighthouses and fortifications on most of the islands in the past and in the late 1800s the Isle of May had a population of over 20.

If the connection was to Ireland which is more likely, one possible location is Lifford, Clonleigh Parish, County Donegal -- also known as Leifear and Liffer -- but not as Lith. County Donegal is on the northwest coast with Lifford itself located on the Donegal - Tyrone county border, relatively near to County Antrim on the northeast coast from where John and Rosanna's ship departed for America.

The parents of John cannot be proved at this time without additional records because of the discrepancies in records available and the commonality of his name. Our immigrant John was born circa 1728 presumably in Antrim, Ireland primarily because his ship came to America from Belfast with passengers from the Antrim and Larne area; Antrim is only 60 miles from Tyrone so John could have been born further west.

Numerous online trees show the parents of John as James Glenn (1680, Boyburn, Tyrone, Ireland - 1747, Derry, Ireland), son of Ninian Glen born Aug 1700 in Lifford, Ireland, and of Jean Caldwell (1679-1733), a set of parents also claimed by the descendants of an immigrant also named John Glenn who settled in Pennsylvania and did military service there in 1776. A birth record shows a James Glenn born in 1701-- not about 1680 as noted on the trees -- to Ninian Glenn and Elizabeth Wyllie in Scotland -- not Ireland; that birth is about 40 years and a country away from where John's father was supposedly born, although his father could easily have immigrated to Ireland. Records for a James Glenn (without parents given) showed a James farming in 1740 in Tyrone and a James' death in Derry, Boyturn, Ardstraw, Tyrone, Ireland in 1747. Nothing indicated the James Glenn born in Scotland is the James Glenn who died in Ireland, and nothing connected our John in Antrim to a James Glenn in Glascow, Scotland or a James Glenn in Tyrone, Ireland, although Tyrone and Antrim are only 60 miles apart.


Detailed sources:

--Janie Revill, Protestant Immigrants (Irish) to South Carolina, A Compilation of the Original Lists of Protestant Immigrants to South Carolina 1763-1773: Petitions for Land 1763-1773, Council Journal 34, p. 53-61, 13 Feb 1768 (Clearfield Publishing Co, Columbia, SC 1939; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD) Rec. Date: 1981, p. 101-102 (electronic p. 103-104); http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=48270. (John Glenn petition for warrant of survey)
--P. William Filby, editor, with Mary K. Meyer, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, A guide to published arrival records of about 5,000,000 passengers who came to the US and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. First Edition, Volume 3 (O-R), Gale Research Co., Book Tower Detroit, MI 48226) Rec. Date: 1981, pg. 1623.
--Richard K. MacMaster, They Came Through Charleston, Ulster Roots, http://www.electricscotland.com/familytree/magazine/augsep2002/ulster_roots.htm, Aug-Sep 2002
--Brig "Lord Dungannon," Belfast to Charleston (shipping advertisement); The Belfast Newsletter, 8 Sep 1769 [sic]; http://www.dippam.ac.uk/ied/records/25498, CMSIED 9701118, 10 Sep 1769 [sic], Central Library, Belfast, Ireland
--Snow "James and Mary," Larne, Ireland to Charleston, 1768, http://files.usgwarchives.net/sc/charleston/history/other/passenge4ms.txt (Calwell, Douglass, McCleland families)
--Notice to Passengers for Brig "Lord Dungannon," The Belfast Newsletter And General Advertiser, Tuesday, 6 October, 1767; CMSIED 9311376
http://www.dippam.ac.uk/ied/records/33155, Central Library, Belfast, Ireland (Lord Dungannon sailing notice)
--Cheri Reeves Research, West Sacramento, CA; http://www.genealogy.com/ftm/r/e/e/Cheryle-L-Reeves/index.html; https://www.ancestry.it/boards/thread.aspx?o=10&m=4238.1.1.2.2.1.1&p=surnames.bailey, 19 Jan 2009 (Brig Lord Dungagannon and Bounty Lands)
--Phil Norfleet, Incentives for Migration to South Carolina Before the Revolution, http://sc_tories.tripod.com/migration_to_sc_before_the_revolution.htm, accessed 2017.
--John Glen plat for 200 acres, Berkeley Co, SC Colonial Plat Books, http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=108517;
--John Glen 2nd plat for 200 acres, Craven Co, SC Colonial Plat Books,
http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=108518
--1825 Newberry District, SC map, surveyed in 1820, depicts John O. Glenn's neighbor Coate's home; http://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~23873~860040:Newberry-District,-South-Carolina-?sort=Pub_List_No_InitialSort&qvq=q:newberry%2Bdistrict%2C%2Bsouth%2Bcarolina;sort:Pub_List_No_InitialSort;lc:RUMSEY~8~1&mi=0&trs=1
--Little River, Newberry/Saluda counties Deer Harvest map with interactive portion detailing Rocky Branch and nearby Mill Creek where the Glenns and Beams lived; http://deerhuntersguide.com/whitetail/geopoint/900525557.html
--South Saluda River, including Rock Branch and Mill Creek; http://www.scdhec.gov/HomeAndEnvironment/Docs/03050109-02.pdf
--John Glen's will, 20 Sep 1784, 96th District, Newberry Co, SC Will Book A, p. 5, proved 23 Sep 1878, transcript at http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=301712; Leonardo Andreas file, FHL film #331-954-541, p. 25, item 161, states name is John Glen -- not John O. Glen.
--John Belton O'Neall, The Annals of Newberry [County, SC]: Historical, Biographical and Anecdotal; https://archive.org/stream/cu31924028790421/cu31924028790421_djvu.txt; Charleston, S.C; S.G. Courtenay and Co., 1859; (extensive anecdotal data on Col David Glyn, reportedly John Glenn's brother)
--Dr. Joseph Gaston Baillie Bulloch, compiler, A History of the Glen family of South Carolina and Georgia, unknown publisher, Washington DC, Nov 1923, http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=11904 or https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89062872197 (not a source because does not include our ancestor because focuses on well known personages & illustrious ancestors)
--Kevin Kenny, New Directions in Irish-American History, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI, 2003; researched by Vicki Reynolds. (ship owner John Montgomery)
--Brief History of King's Creek Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, http://news.rootsweb.com/th/read/SCNEWBER/2006-04/1146246269
--South Carolina Archives, AA 2899, pp. ifff-7fff (copy audited account of John Glenn for militia duty)
--The American Revolution in South Carolina: The Little River District Regiment of Militia; http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_militia_sc_little_river_district_regiment.html (Pvt John Glenn)
--John Glenn, DAR Patriotic Service, ancestor # A045544, service and lineage data, http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search_adb/default.cfm
--Revolutionary War Pay Record, John Glen,
http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc=rqp8&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&indiv=1&db=revwarmuster&gss=angs-d&new=1&rank=1&msT=1&gsfn=john&gsfn_x=1&gsln=glen&gsln_x=NP_NN&msipn__ftp=south%20carolina&gskw=little%20river%20district&MSAV=1&uidh=doc&pcat=39&fh=0&h=660809&recoff=8%209&ml_rpos=1
--Islands of the Forth; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islands_of_the_Forth.
--Leith, Scotland; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leith.

Child of John Glenn I

Children of John Glenn I and Rosanna (Unknown)

Citations

  1. [S575] Marilyn Szum Research.
  2. [S576] John Glenn Will.
  3. [S592] Vicki Reynolds Research.

Rosanna (Unknown)1,2,3

F, ID# 11247, (c 1738 - Aug 1808)
Charts:Amanda Ola Weathers lineage
     Rosanna (Unknown) was born c 1738 at Ireland. She married John Glenn I c 1764 at Ireland. Rosanna (Unknown) immigrated in 1768 to Charleston, South Carolina. She died in Aug 1808 at Newberry Co, South Carolina.
      Roseanna Glenn could be the sister of William Harbison who was referred to in John Glenn's will as "my brother," a term often used for brother-in-laws.

In 1790 Rosannah was shown on the 96th District, Newberry Co, SC census with 2 males under 16 (John and William), 1 male over 16 (James), and 4 females (Rosannah, Mary, Ann and either Jane or Margaret, with the other already living elsewhere.) By 1800 Rosannah, age over 45, was enumerated in Newberry Co with a son age 16-26 (likely William) and 2 unknown females age 26-45, who were not her daughters Mary and Ann, ages 20 and 22 that year, unless they were incorrectly enumerated.

Rosanna's reported Aug 1808 death date is supported by her son James Glenn taking over as adminstrator for the estate of his father John Glenn on 15 Aug 1808. Included in James' administration package was a $4000.00 bond with his brother William Glenn and presumed brother-in-law David Peterson as his securities; the inventory and appraisal of the estate; and the sale of the personal property. Among the buyers at the estate sale were siblings James, William, Ann and John Glenn junior.

As is often the case, there were several Rosanna/h Glenns born or married into this line, thus care needs to be taken when apportioning records among the women. Rosannah's same-named potential sister-in-law was also on both the 1790 and 1800 Newberry Co, SC census.

Children of Rosanna (Unknown) and John Glenn I

Citations

  1. [S575] Marilyn Szum Research.
  2. [S1] "Virginia Winslett Research."
  3. [S592] Vicki Reynolds Research.

Jane "Jean" Glenn1

F, ID# 11248, (c 1765 - c 1835)
Father:John Glenn I (1728 - a 18 Mar 1787)
Mother:Rosanna (Unknown) (c 1738 - Aug 1808)
     Jane "Jean" Glenn was born c 1765 at Ireland. She was the daughter of John Glenn I and Rosanna (Unknown). Jane "Jean" Glenn immigrated in 1768 to Charleston, South Carolina. She married John McGowan a 1793. Jane "Jean" Glenn died c 1835. Her estate was probated on 14 Sep 1835 at Newberry District, South Carolina.
      Jane Glenn was also known as Jean. On 31 Oct 1794 Matthew Herberson [sic], son of William Herberson, deceased, deeded Jean Glenn of Chester Co, Pickney District, SC 100 acres land in Newberry District, part of 200 acres granted in 1774 to Susannah ____ and by her conveyed in 1776 by lease and release, thus leasing until he paid for the land, to William Harberson. Witnesses were James Glenn, Robert Spear and William Spear. Jane's father's will bequeathed 100 acres purchased from William Herbison to Jane's brother William, who was only 5 when the will was probated and only 11 when the land was deeded to Jane.

Conjecture was Jane married a Glenn, however research by descendant Vicki Reynolds showed on 8 Dec 1834 Jane McGowen made a deed of gift of a slave to her sister Anne Glen. Witnesses were Jesse Speer and Nicholas Summer.

This researcher presumed John McGowen was Jane Glenn's husband. John McGowen's 4 Jun 1833 will written in Laurens District, adjacent to Newberry District, provided 1/3 his estate proceeds to his wife Jane McGowen and 2/3 to his grandchildren, some or all of whom were clearly minors, and for whatever reason bypassed his children. William McGowen senior and Jonathan Reed were his executors and his witnesses were Glen M. Young, Jonathan Reed and Wm McGovern junior, Robert and Lousia Cuningham, and William McGowen.

Jane McGowen's 21 Feb 1835 Newberry District, SC will bequeathed all of her property to James Galloway and did not note a husband or children. Jean's executor was Michael Werts and her witnesses were R. B. Nance, Sam Fair and James Enlow. Michael Werts lived adjacent to the lands inherited by Jane's brothers James and John Glenn and was thus noted in the 1835 Bill of Partition filed by Jane's nephew Peter Glen concerning the Henry Coate's lands. Jane's niece Lucinda Glenn was married to a Galloway. The 26 Oct 1774 Newberry Co, SC will of Peter Galloway appointed William Herbison and Robert Speer as administrators; men with those names were noted in Jane's father's will, so the Glenns, Galloways, Herbisons and Speers were close.


Detailed sources:
--Jane McGowen deed to her sister Anne Glen, 8 Dec 1834, Leonardo Andrea Files, microfilm 333-954-541, p. 3, item 17; transcribed by Vicki Reynolds.
--Jane McGowen 21 Feb 1835 will, Newberry District, SC Estate Record Book M, p. 205, http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=302831.
--John McGowen 4 Jun 1833 will, Laurens District, SC Estate Record Book F, p. 501, http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=297944.

Citations

  1. [S576] John Glenn Will.

John Glenn II1,2

M, ID# 11249, (a 1775 - c 1838)
Father:John Glenn I (1728 - a 18 Mar 1787)
Mother:Rosanna (Unknown) (c 1738 - Aug 1808)
     John Glenn II was born a 1775 at Newberry, Newberry Co, South Carolina. He was the son of John Glenn I and Rosanna (Unknown). John Glenn II married Naomi Peterson a 1808. John Glenn II died c 1838 at Newberry Co, South Carolina.
      John Glenn I's birth date was established based on him likely being one of the sons under age 16 in his mother's household in 1790. John stayed in Newberry Co, SC, unlike his siblings who moved to Alabama. When he married the widow Naomi Goggans, John took possession of land previously owned by Daniel Goggans deceased. John and Naomi married about 1808 or earlier because that would have given Naomi time to have her last child by 1819 when her childbearing years were waning. John Glynn [sic] was noted living in the area of Rocky Creek and the Little River on the 1816 and 1817 land plats for William Law and John Wylie respectively. On the Little River in Newberry District John Glenn acquired 54 acres on 27 Jan 1817 adjacent to Wiliam Goggins and Bartlett Satterwhite and 321 acres on 20 Feb 1817 adjacent to Rebecca Satterwhite, William Gogan and Ezekiah Eastland. On 26 Mar John Glenn was appointed a Justice of the Peace for Newberry District. John's 20 Nov 1835 will established his wife Naomi as the administrator, and his estate appraisers were William Harmon, John Jamieson and William Adam. With the death of John, lawsuits erupted among his wife, children and stepchildren from 1837 until at least 1855 regarding their share of their birth fathers' and later their mother's and siblings' estates.


Detailed sources:

--John Glenn 20 Nov 1835 Newberry Co, SC Will Book M, 1838, p. 68 and 202-204; Box 66, Packet 165, estate #1698.

Children of John Glenn II and Naomi Peterson

Citations

  1. [S576] John Glenn Will.
  2. [S592] Vicki Reynolds Research.

Mary Glenn1,2

F, ID# 11250, (a 1778 - )
Father:John Glenn I (1728 - a 18 Mar 1787)
Mother:Rosanna (Unknown) (c 1738 - Aug 1808)
     Mary Glenn was born a 1778 at Newberry, Newberry Co, South Carolina. She was the daughter of John Glenn I and Rosanna (Unknown). Mary Glenn married David Peterson a 1798.
      David Peterson was thought to have married one of John and Rosanna Glenn's four daughters and this researcher presumed David married Mary. Mary's sister Ann died unmarried according to her probate; Jean married a McGowan; and Margaret married a Linsly. Granted the latter two women could have also married David Peterson but no husband was noted for Mary and it was not said she died unmarried.

The 12 Mar 1849 widow's application in Picken's District, SC of a Mary Moore widow of Burt Moore of Halifax Co, VA has been annotated to show she was born Mary Glenn. This Mary Glenn Moore is NOT our Mary Glenn because she notes she was born in 1780, married in 1797 and that her brother John was born in Mar 1798. Our Mary's mother Rosanne Glenn had her last child in 1782 and was already at that point outside her average childbearing years having been born about 1738. Secondly, our Mary's brother John could not have been born in 1798, married about 1821 and had 8 children who by the time his wife Naomi prepared her 1841 will included 5 married daughters. Although our immigrant ancestor had two sons with children named Mary and John, the Mary Glenn who married Burt Moore could not be one of their daughters, so she must be from another Glenn line or has been erroneously connected to the Glenns.

Citations

  1. [S401] Timothy Beam Reseach.
  2. [S576] John Glenn Will.