Susan Aydelotte1,2

F, ID# 1471, (8 Feb 1820 - 10 Jun 1906)
     Susan Aydelotte was born on 8 Feb 1820 at Worcester Co, Maryland. She married William Corbin Slocomb, son of William Slocomb (senior) and Lavinia Corbin, on 22 Dec 1840 at Worcester Co, Maryland. Susan Aydelotte died on 10 Jun 1906 at Onancock, Accomack Co, Virginia, at age 86. She was buried at Onancock Cemetery, Accomack Co, Virginia.
      Susan was listed with her son in the census of in 1880 at Atlantic District, Bay Side, Accomack Co, VA. She was shown as Susan Slocomb, a 60 year old mother in household #60 headed by C. S. Slocomb, a 28 year old farmer. She was born in MD and all others were born in VA.

Susan was listed as a head of household in the census of in 1900 at Onancock, Lee District, Accomack Co, VA. She was shown as Susan Slocomb the head of household #15, age 80, born in Feb 1820 in MD, as were both of her parents. Everyone else was born in VA, except Mollie, who was also born in MD. She had given birth to 11 children and 6 were living. Listed with her were the following Slocombs: Cuthbert S., a 48 year old son & dry goods merchant born May 1852; Mollie J., a 24 year old daughter-in-law born in Jun 1875 in MD, they had been married for 4 years; Austin D., a 46 year old son & dry goods merchant, born in Mar 1854; James W., a 38 year old son & dry goods merchant, born in Jun 1861; Manie A., a 24 year old daughter-in-law, born in Jun 1876, they had been married for 6 years with 2 children; Nina M., a 4 year old granddaughter, born in Jun 1895; and Susan A., a 1 year old granddaughter; born in Aug 1898.

On 3 May 1868, from her home in Horntown, VA, Susan Aydelotte Slocomb wrote the following letter to her son Frank A. Slocomb who was in Chestertown, MD. Dear Son. I received your letter two day after you wrote it and was very glad to hear from you for I was getting uneasy as it was so long since you wrote before. We are all well at present. My other 2 boarders left yesterday for Amboy with the last load of oysters. Capt is going to send away this season. Mr. Wesley Lamden came to board with us about 3 weeks ago, but I don't know how long he will stay. Joe was here today and carried Nettie to Henry Lindsey's and back again, if you can pay Esther for Nettie's board I shall be very glad for I cannot spare the money. We have corn to buy and will have meat to buy before long. I have all my butter to buy have to pay 55cts per lb for it. Capt only pays me a little money at a time. He owes me about $34 now. Cavy(?) has used you father's fodder and corn and he cannot get any money from him. We had a severe thunderstorm and hail yesterday. The hailstones were as large as the end of your thumb. Joe said it was as large as hen eggs at his house. Broke out five window lights and cut his flowers al to pieces. John Slocomb and Jane was here today. Said it was the same there. Eliza Drummond is here. George Crosswell has sold his farm, but has not concluded where to go to yet. I walked out to Horntown today and 2 weeks ago to church. They have just commenced the Sunday. Brittann goes to school to Mrs. Johnson (Sue Marshall it was). I could not let Nettie go to Baltimore as I was not able to pay her board and I have enough for her to do. Has your arm got well yet? I was much pleased to hear of the debating society. I think it will be a very good school for you. When you write again let me know some of the questions you have to discuss. And my dear child stick to your church and Sunday school. I heard four names read out of church. Jack Evans, John Hopkins, John Paradise & Fam (Tom?) Kelly. I was very sorry to hear it. Cuthbert don't get to oyster none now as he has to plough. We have only got Phillis. Sold the black horse to Cavy(?) and have not got anything for it yet. The spring is very backward. Your father is nearly done planting corn. I don't know what will become of us next year for I do not expect we can stay here. But I trust in the Lord that there will be a way provided. I shall be very glad to see you here this summer if you can come without incurring too much expense. I would like to go somewhere to keep boarders, if I knew where to go. Capt does not intend that the farm shall ever be any help to us. He denies ever saying that he bought it to befriend us. He says he bought it for himself and gave a big price for it and let us stay there the balance of the year for nothing. So he thinks that was a great deal, but I will not complain. I will hope for better times. Corn is $1.25cts per bushel and meat is 25cts per lb. -- May 9th --
I will write a little more. Capt meet with an accident Wednesday. He sold some oysters to a vessel and brought a little pistol from the Capt. Carried it home and was showing it to Ida. Told her it was not loaded. As she was looking at it, it went of and shot him through the thigh. He fell and frightened then very much. Sent for Dr. Field & Tod. They did not take the ball out. He is doing very well. Can walk about some with crutches. Your Aunt Ann(?) was here some weeks ago. She says you must write to her and send her your picture. Your Father and all the children join me in love to you no more from your ever-affectionate mother. Susan Slocomb.

On 20 Mar 1870, from her home in Horntown, VA Susan Aydelotte Slocomb wrote the following letter to her son Frank A. Slocomb who was in Chestertown, MD. Dear Son. I received your letter last night and will write for fear you may move before long. But if you are getting anything I would advise you to stay unless you are certain of doing better. A half loaf is better than none and you had better put up with some inconveniences than to always to be wandering from one place to another. A rolling stone gathers no moss. I think you have provide that. It would have been much better for you to have stayed at Galena the first time you were there, even on small wages. Never give a certainty for an uncertainty. Please write that in your hat. Experience keeps a dear school. I hope you have learnt something which may prove of more value to you than money, and don't spoon a parents advice, for I tell you they are older than you. Times is too hard now to try to start any kind of business. I don't know how the merchants get along here. They don't trust, so they can't be loosing much. I heard that Mr. Tom Gibbs gets his goods in Mr. Johnsons name. What few he gets. They don't keep much goods in Horntown in none of the stores. Riley Stantd does a good business in the Neck, but some say if his debts were paid he would not be worth anything. John Selby is pretty will off, so the times don't affect him much. But he has got the name of cheating in every form and shape. There never was such an outcry of hard times about here since I have been on the Shore, the failure of the crops last year and the failure of the oysters this winter. Your Father did not make corn enough to last 4 months. He has bought ten bushels and we are nearly out now. If he had the money he could buy it of Bable Mason for 75cts a bushel. He has some on the seaside to sell. Bloodgood said if we could not get anything from you he would be your Father's security for some corn. He has got no money, but them that has it to sell wants the money. So I don't know what we shall do. I never knew what it was to be uneasy about something to eat before. We are all well except Wallace. He has the whooping cough, which has pulled him down. None of the children go to school now. Austin has to stay at home to work. I could spare Brittann, but she has no shoes. We had very pretty weather in Jan, but it has been very cold and bad for the last six or seven weeks which makes the farmers backward. I have not been to church since I wrote to you. It rained or snowed every Sunday. Today is a very fine day, but it is not preaching day. Ida's child had the croup very bad. They thought it would die, but it has got nearly well. Nettie is there yet, but wants to go to Baltimore or Philadelphia, but I think she had better stay where she is until times get better. I tell you we will have to do anyway now. I got a letter from your Aunt Esther. Joshua is at Norfolk and likes it very well. There is no news. I don't know who to go to for help. Them that would help us is not able. I shall write to John Silverthorn tomorrow. Your Father says he owes him $30, but he wrote to him to send us a barrel of flour and he did not do it.
-- March 21 -- Wm Cropper moved to Baltimore last fall and has moved back now, much worse off than when he went. I trust in God that there will be a way provided for us. I have about a quarter barrel of flour yet and will sell some hens to get some corn. So will try and make out until you can send me some money. May the Lord bless and preserve you is the constant prayer of your devoted mother. Susan Slocomb.
-- Dear child don't be discouraged, but trust in God and I hope times will be better in the spring. Did you go to James Slocomb last fall? Perhaps he could get you a place in Philadelphia. But because of doing better before you leave where you are, if you are making anything at all. Your Father and all the children join me in love to you. Mr. Hanson was here yesterday. He says he has not made his board this winter. He sent his best respects to you.

On 15 Jun 1870, from her home in Horntown, VA, Susan Aydelotte Slocomb wrote the following letter to her son Frank A. Slocomb who was in Chestertown, Kent Co, MD. My Dear Son. I received your letter and the money safely, day before yesterday. Your father went to New Church yesterday and bought corn with it. He got it for $1 per bushel, so I sent what wool I had to spare. All together got 6 bushels. We had to borrow nearly a bushel, but I guess you need not send any more if your are coming home. We have not seen Dr. Horsey, but I dare say he will lend us the money, but I shall not ask him unless I get pushed up. I hope we can make out without it. Try and bring me a barrel of flour when you come as mine will be gone by that time. We have enough meat. We get clams and some fish. I make plenty butter now. Spare a pound sometimes to Mr. Major Watson. He was good enough to fix up a plough last spring for your Father and trusted him. So I am trying to pay him. We are all well. Wallace has got well again and started to school yesterday. Brittann is going now awhile. Ida was here Sunday afternoon. She has named her babe Kate Luise. It is right pretty. They are all well. Will had not got back yet. Abram has grown much prettier and is a very smart child. Ida has a white girl living with her. Nettie was here last week. She was well and said she sent you a letter the day before. I wish you could have waited for your shirts and brought the stuff home and I could have made them for you. If you have any old clothes try and bring them home with you. It is hard struggling to get along sure enough, but Ida hopes times will be better before long. I think this year will finish up some of the farmers. They will have to hire themselves out and go at something else. People ask such enormous rents for their farms that it will take all a person can make to pay the rent. Mr. Evans asks a hundred dollars for next year also. If your father could do any better he would not stay. It is a pleasant place to live and we like it very well, but the land is so very poor. But I guess if we can't do any better we will have to stay. If I live and nothing happens, I want to go to Baltimore this fall and if I can get anything to do I will hire myself out and try and make a little something. We have had a great deal of wet weather which has put us behind in working the corn, but it looks right well. I don't get to church as it is too far to walk and the horse has so much to do I can't drive her Sundays. Dear child I am very thankful for your help. I don't know what we should do without it. There is no news. Your Father and all the children join me in love to you. Dear child don't be discouraged. Poverty is no disgrace, but it is very inconvenient. Trust in God and I hope he will bring all things right in his own good time. John Selby told your Father to say to you that he has declined having two stores at present. He has DeWitt Tull for clerk yet. No more from your faithful mother. Susan Slocomb -- Write soon and let me know when you will come if you could come in a sailboat perhaps it would be cheaper and you could get Ben Evans to bring you up. But I guess your Father can go after you as the horse will not have to work so hard by that time.

On 15 Feb 1874, from her home in New Church, VA, Susan Aydelotte Slocomb wrote the following letter to her son Frank A. Slocomb who was in Chestertown, MD. Dear Son. I received your letter and was glad to hear from you and very much obliged to you for paying my debts. Cuthbert has sold the pony at last. He has lost some days work riding around trying to sell him. At last let Mr. Duer have him last Friday for thirty dollars. He bought 35 bushels of corn from Sylvester Bunting at 75cts, which was $26.25cts and Bunting is going away so he had to raise the money to pay him. Owed Mr. Duer $2.14cts, which came out of it so you see there is not much left. Bought 2 barrels corn from James Johnson. Was $7 of the money you gave me and what he had paid for what we owe him, $3 for a stack of straw. I have not got a barrel flour yet. Cuthbert went to New Town some time ago to see Bloodgood about log timber and the flour. He said damned if he would get any flour out of him and if he wanted any log timber he might get it himself. He had sold the pony to Mr. Hall for $35. Cuthbert told him it was all right but when he wanted the pay he let him know he could not get it, that he had let Hall have it to pay his debts. Cuthbert told him he could not do that for we had to have corn and the horse had to pay it. He got very wroth, told Cuthbert to leave the place, and if he did not get the horse it would be the worse for him. Cuthbert got mad too so they had a quarrel and he came home. That night Ida wrote to me a letter hoping I would not worry over it as it was all nothing. Will said I might stay here from July to eternity for all he cared. Mr. Hall came the next day after the horse. I told him when Bloodgood owned a horse here he could come and get it. He said he owed him about $300. Said he euchard(?) the people around Newtown about $1,000 this winter. So I have not heard from them since. Mr. Powell & Will went down to his place to take the furniture I suppose for board. So last Thursday they had a sale there. So I don't know what they will do now. No furniture to keep house and no money to board. I suppose they will go to Amboy. I feel very sorry for Ida. The situation she is in. But if they go to Amboy, I am certain they will be kind to her and not let her suffer for they all think a great deal of her. Cuthbert brought his sheep and cattle home yesterday. He told Mr. Tunnell he might have 4 for $10. He could not see him yesterday so brought 7 home. Could not find the other 3. He thinks he can get $4 a piece for them. He traded sal(?) for another horse younger and stronger and gentle, but blind. Got $25. Boot to be paid next May. He can get oats to sow from Mr. Corbin out of that. I think it is a very good horse. They say he is worth $200 if he had good eyes. Traded with Mr. Hancock. Got his note and security. He is a very upright man. Cuthbert has not done much towards farming. Has got about 600 fence rails. Austin has been going to school. If he could go all this year I think he could learn. Mrs. Bettie says he can learn as fast as any scholar she has. He is learning dictionary and geography. He is ahead of Erastus Poulston. Keeps near the head in his class. He has got a start now and if he could keep on he could learn. But will soon have to stop and that disheartens him. I can't get any work around here for myself & Fannie to do. My news paper is out, shall get the last one tomorrow. Been trying to raise a club but nearly all take it around here. If you have made up a club you can send for me one for $1. If you can write and let me know. If not, I can get Mr. Covington to send for me one for that. It has been quite lively around here this winter. We are all well at present. David has not got his money from Sandy Hill yet. He owes Cuthbert some so I guess we can make out. My hens has not commenced laying yet. But I live in hopes of better times. The children all join me in love to you. No more from your mother. Susan Slocomb. -- Write this week and let me know about the paper. I feel lost without it. Nettie and family are getting along very well.

Susan died at home at age 86 in Onancock survived by sons Cuthbert, Wallace and Austin and daughters Mrs. Leonidas R. Doughty and Mrs. William Bloodgood of Norfolk and Mrs. Nettie Jones, wife of David Jones, Esq. of New Church.

Child of Susan Aydelotte and William Corbin Slocomb

Citations

  1. [S376] William Slocomb 1871 Death.
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."
  3. [S378] Frank Slocomb 1892 Death.

Mary (Unknown)1

F, ID# 1472, (c 1730 - )
     Mary (Unknown) was born c 1730. She married Solomon Russell I, son of Samuel Russell (weaver) and Anne (Unknown), c 1750.

Children of Mary (Unknown) and Solomon Russell I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

George Russell I1,2,3

M, ID# 1473, (c 1750 - )
Father:Solomon Russell I (c 1713 - )
Mother:Mary (Unknown) (c 1730 - )
     George Russell I was born c 1750. He was the son of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown). George Russell I married Sarah Bonnewell, daughter of (Unknown) Bonnewell, c 1772. His estate was probated on 26 Nov 1782.

Children of George Russell I and Sarah Bonnewell

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S34] W. Stratton Nottingham (1837-1932), Russell Family of the Eastern Shore.
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Solomon Russell II1

M, ID# 1474, (Nov 1756 - )
Father:Solomon Russell I (c 1713 - )
Mother:Mary (Unknown) (c 1730 - )
     Solomon Russell II was born in Nov 1756. He was the son of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown). Solomon Russell II married Jeminah "Jamina" (Unknown) on 6 Aug 1805. His estate was probated on 25 Dec 1826.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Jemimea Russell1

F, ID# 1475, (c 1762 - )
Father:Solomon Russell I (c 1713 - )
Mother:Mary (Unknown) (c 1730 - )
     Jemimea Russell was born c 1762. She was the daughter of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown).

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Mary Russell1

F, ID# 1476, (c 1764 - )
Father:Solomon Russell I (c 1713 - )
Mother:Mary (Unknown) (c 1730 - )
     Mary Russell was born c 1764. She was the daughter of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown).

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Sarah Royal1

F, ID# 1477, (c 1735 - )
Father:Benjamin Royal I (a 1699 - )
Mother:Rachel Townsend (a 1704 - )
     Sarah Royal was born c 1735. She was the daughter of Benjamin Royal I and Rachel Townsend. Sarah Royal married Andrew Russell, son of Samuel Russell (weaver) and Anne (Unknown), c 1755 at Accomack Co, Virginia.

Citations

  1. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Esther "Hessy" Bayly1,2

F, ID# 1478, (c 1765 - b 26 Mar 1821)
Father:Robert Bayly II (of Pokomoke) (c 1725 - )
Mother:Mary Massey (c 1725 - )
     Esther "Hessy" Bayly was born c 1765. She was the daughter of Robert Bayly II (of Pokomoke) and Mary Massey. Esther "Hessy" Bayly married Robert Russell, son of Robert Russell I and Scarburgh Parker, c 1785. Esther "Hessy" Bayly died b 26 Mar 1821.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

George Hutchinson1

M, ID# 1479, (Oct 1856 - )
     George Hutchinson was born in Oct 1856 at Alabama.

Children of George Hutchinson

Citations

  1. [S555] Rita Talton Barrett Research.

Sallie Lou Machen1

F, ID# 1480, (Jan 1891 - )
     Sallie Lou Machen was born in Jan 1891 at Talladega Co, Alabama. She married Walter W. Hutchinson, son of George Hutchinson, on 24 Dec 1908 at Talladega Co, Alabama.

Citations

  1. [S555] Rita Talton Barrett Research.

CC Davies

F, ID# 1481
Father:George Edward Davies (a 1930 - )
Mother:Nancy Ellin Maginnis
     CC Davies is the daughter of George Edward Davies and Nancy Ellin Maginnis.

Sarah Bonnewell1,2,3

F, ID# 1482, (c 1750 - b 4 Feb 1804)
Father:(Unknown) Bonnewell (a 1718 - )
     Sarah Bonnewell was born c 1750. She was the daughter of (Unknown) Bonnewell. Sarah Bonnewell married George Russell I, son of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown), c 1772. Sarah Bonnewell married Smith Melson c 1784. Sarah Bonnewell died b 4 Feb 1804.

Children of Sarah Bonnewell and George Russell I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S34] W. Stratton Nottingham (1837-1932), Russell Family of the Eastern Shore.
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Robert Russell1

M, ID# 1483, (c 1776 - b 20 Jan 1832)
Father:George Russell I (c 1750 - )
Mother:Sarah Bonnewell (c 1750 - b 4 Feb 1804)
     Robert Russell was born c 1776. He was the son of George Russell I and Sarah Bonnewell. Robert Russell married Margaret "Peggy" Lewis, daughter of James Lewis and Peggy Bonnewell, c 1800. Robert Russell died b 20 Jan 1832.

Citations

  1. [S34] W. Stratton Nottingham (1837-1932), Russell Family of the Eastern Shore.

Margaret "Peggy" Russell1

F, ID# 1484, (c 1778 - )
Father:George Russell I (c 1750 - )
Mother:Sarah Bonnewell (c 1750 - b 4 Feb 1804)
     Margaret "Peggy" Russell was born c 1778. She was the daughter of George Russell I and Sarah Bonnewell. Margaret "Peggy" Russell married Benjamin West on 7 Jun 1800.

Citations

  1. [S34] W. Stratton Nottingham (1837-1932), Russell Family of the Eastern Shore.

Isaiah Russell1

M, ID# 1485, (c 1774 - )
Father:George Russell I (c 1750 - )
Mother:Sarah Bonnewell (c 1750 - b 4 Feb 1804)
     Isaiah Russell was born c 1774. He was the son of George Russell I and Sarah Bonnewell.

Citations

  1. [S34] W. Stratton Nottingham (1837-1932), Russell Family of the Eastern Shore.

Thomas Bonnewell1

M, ID# 1486, (a 1743 - )
Father:(Unknown) Bonnewell (a 1718 - )
     Thomas Bonnewell was born a 1743. He was the son of (Unknown) Bonnewell.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Smith Melson1

M, ID# 1487, (a 1759 - )
     Smith Melson was born a 1759. He married Sarah Bonnewell, daughter of (Unknown) Bonnewell, c 1784.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Peggy Bonnewell1

F, ID# 1488, (a 1745 - )
Father:(Unknown) Bonnewell (a 1718 - )
     Peggy Bonnewell was born a 1745. She was the daughter of (Unknown) Bonnewell. Peggy Bonnewell married James Lewis, son of John Lewis (of William) and Joanna Taylor, a 1760.

Children of Peggy Bonnewell and James Lewis

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

James Lewis1

M, ID# 1489, (a 1738 - Apr 1784)
Father:John Lewis (of William) (a 1700 - b 30 Mar 1762)
Mother:Joanna Taylor (a 1700 - )
     James Lewis was born a 1738. He was the son of John Lewis (of William) and Joanna Taylor. James Lewis married Peggy Bonnewell, daughter of (Unknown) Bonnewell, a 1760. James Lewis died in Apr 1784.

Children of James Lewis and Peggy Bonnewell

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Margaret "Peggy" Lewis1

F, ID# 1490, (c 1762 - b Aug 1831)
Father:James Lewis (a 1738 - Apr 1784)
Mother:Peggy Bonnewell (a 1745 - )
     Margaret "Peggy" Lewis was born c 1762. She was the daughter of James Lewis and Peggy Bonnewell. Margaret "Peggy" Lewis married Robert Russell, son of George Russell I and Sarah Bonnewell, c 1800. Margaret "Peggy" Lewis died b Aug 1831.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Sarah "Sally" Lewis1,2

F, ID# 1491, (a 1764 - Dec 1832)
Father:James Lewis (a 1738 - Apr 1784)
Mother:Peggy Bonnewell (a 1745 - )
     Sarah "Sally" Lewis was born a 1764. She was the daughter of James Lewis and Peggy Bonnewell. Sarah "Sally" Lewis died in Dec 1832.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Planer William Lewis1,2

M, ID# 1492, (a 1760 - )
Father:James Lewis (a 1738 - Apr 1784)
Mother:Peggy Bonnewell (a 1745 - )
     Planer William Lewis was born a 1760. He was the son of James Lewis and Peggy Bonnewell.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Jeminah "Jamina" (Unknown)1

F, ID# 1493, (1766 - )
     Jeminah "Jamina" (Unknown) was born in 1766 at Accomack Co, Virginia. She married Unknown Fluhart a 1788. Jeminah "Jamina" (Unknown) married Solomon Russell II, son of Solomon Russell I and Mary (Unknown), on 6 Aug 1805.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

PVT Andrew Jackson "John" Weathers1

M, ID# 1494, (c 1835 - 15 Jan 1898)
Father:PVT Stephen "Yank" Weathers (c 1809 - 18 Jul 1897)
Mother:(1st wife of Stephen Weathers) (Unknown) (a 1815 - a 1833)
     PVT Andrew Jackson "John" Weathers was born c 1835 at Georgia. He was the son of PVT Stephen "Yank" Weathers and (1st wife of Stephen Weathers) (Unknown). PVT Andrew Jackson "John" Weathers married Mary Ann Scarborough on 28 Sep 1858 at Drew Co, Arkansas. PVT Andrew Jackson "John" Weathers died on 15 Jan 1898.
      Andrew Jackson Weathers, who also used the names John, Jack, Withers and Wethers, was the son of Stephen Weathers of Campbell Co, GA based on the high DNA matches among the descendants of Thomas Weathers, Pamela Jane Weathers and Andrew Jackson Weathers. In 1886 Andrew Jackson gave his son the middle name Carrol, which was his step-mother's maiden name.

By 1858 at age about 21 John, who was born in Georgia, was already residing in Arkansas. In 1860 John, age about 22, was residing with his family in Barehouse, Drew Co, Arkansas where he owned $420 in real estate and $200 personal property.

John was residing in 1860 next door to John B. Scarborough and Elizabeth Finklea Scarborough, age 44 and 37, and born in Tennessee and Alabama respectively, the owners of $1000 in real estate and $800 personal property. Sixteen year-old Mary was enumerated in the Scarborough household as well as in the household of her husband John Weathers next door.

John served as a private under Capt. Thatch in Company H, 3rd Regiment, Arkansas Infantry for the Confederacy. Joe Tressare is the third great grandson of Pamela Weathers, the mother-in-law of Oscar Walker Thatch, whose grandfather James Madison Thatch and his brother John Henderson Thatch served during the war in Arkansas. So John Weathers may have served with one of those men and may have moved to Arkansas as a young man together with a community of people he knew from Georgia.

By 1880 John, noted as Jon age 44, was residing in precinct 3, Lee Co, TX where he was farming, and by 1900 his widow Mary was farming in Milam Co, TX. In 1899 Mary applied for and was granted a widow's Confederate pension.

In 1900 Mary was a widow living in Milam Co, TX with four of her children. Next door was her son John "Jasper" Weathers with his family and nearby was her daughter Frances with her family.

Children of PVT Andrew Jackson "John" Weathers and Mary Ann Scarborough

Citations

  1. [S639] Andrew Jackson Weathers Research.

Ann Tabitha (Unknown)1,2

F, ID# 1495, (a 1693 - )
     Ann Tabitha (Unknown) was born a 1693. She married an unknown person a 1713.

Child of Ann Tabitha (Unknown) and William Lewis I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S212] Letter, Mark Clifford Lewis (1887 - 1970) to Elizabeth Harriet Perry (1904-1989), 1960s.

William Lewis II1,2

M, ID# 1496, (a 1712 - b 30 Oct 1770)
Father:William Lewis I (a 1681 - 1739)
Mother:Ann Tabitha (Unknown) (a 1693 - )
     William Lewis II was born a 1712. He was the son of William Lewis I and Ann Tabitha (Unknown). William Lewis II married Amey Turnall a 1735. William Lewis II died b 30 Oct 1770.

Child of William Lewis II

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S212] Letter, Mark Clifford Lewis (1887 - 1970) to Elizabeth Harriet Perry (1904-1989), 1960s.

Ann Tabitha Lewis1,2

F, ID# 1497, (1739 - )
Father:William Lewis II (a 1712 - b 30 Oct 1770)
     Ann Tabitha Lewis was born in 1739. She was the daughter of William Lewis II.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S212] Letter, Mark Clifford Lewis (1887 - 1970) to Elizabeth Harriet Perry (1904-1989), 1960s.

William Anderson (Burgess)1

M, ID# 1498, (1645 - 1698)
     William Anderson (Burgess) was born in 1645 at Pokomoke Neck, Accomack Co, Virginia. He married Mary Wise, daughter of COL John Wise I and Hannah Scarburgh (2nd dau Hannah), c 1667 at Accomack Co, Virginia. William Anderson (Burgess) married Mary (Unknown) in Oct 1678 at Accomack Co, Virginia. William Anderson (Burgess) died in 1698. His estate was probated on 4 Oct 1698 at Accomack Co, Virginia.

Child of William Anderson (Burgess) and Mary Wise

Citations

  1. [S33] Ralph T. Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Mary (Unknown)1,2

F, ID# 1499, (a 1650 - )
     Mary (Unknown) was born a 1650. She married Unknown Renny a 1670. Mary (Unknown) married William Anderson (Burgess) in Oct 1678 at Accomack Co, Virginia.

Citations

  1. [S33] Ralph T. Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore.
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Comfort Anderson1,2

F, ID# 1500, (22 May 1669 - 1743)
Father:William Anderson (Burgess) (1645 - 1698)
Mother:Mary Wise (c 1649 - c 1678)
     Comfort Anderson was born on 22 May 1669 at Accomack Co, Virginia. She was the daughter of William Anderson (Burgess) and Mary Wise. Comfort Anderson married Elias Taylor, son of William Taylor and Elizabeth (Unknown), c 1690. Comfort Anderson died in 1743. Her estate was probated on 31 May 1743 at Accomack Co, Virginia.

Child of Comfort Anderson and Elias Taylor

Citations

  1. [S33] Ralph T. Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore.
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."