Tabitha LeCato1,2

F, ID# 331, (a 1673 - )
Father:John (Jean) LeCato I (a 1632 - )
Mother:Thomasine (Unknown) (1633 - c 1711)
     Tabitha LeCato was born a 1673 at Accomack Co, Virginia. She was the daughter of John (Jean) LeCato I and Thomasine (Unknown).

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Elizabeth LeCato1,2

F, ID# 332, (a 1675 - )
Father:John (Jean) LeCato I (a 1632 - )
Mother:Thomasine (Unknown) (1633 - c 1711)
     Elizabeth LeCato was born a 1675 at Accomack Co, Virginia. She was the daughter of John (Jean) LeCato I and Thomasine (Unknown).

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Mary LeCato1

F, ID# 333, (a 1668 - )
Father:John (Jean) LeCato I (a 1632 - )
Mother:(1st wife Jean LeCato) (Unknown) (a 1636 - )
     Mary LeCato was born a 1668. She was the daughter of John (Jean) LeCato I and (1st wife Jean LeCato) (Unknown). Mary LeCato married (Unknown) Taylor a 1688.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

(Unknown) Taylor1

M, ID# 334, (a 1665 - )
     (Unknown) Taylor was born a 1665. He married Mary LeCato, daughter of John (Jean) LeCato I and (1st wife Jean LeCato) (Unknown), a 1688.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Augustin LeCatt1

M, ID# 335, (a 1688 - )
Father:John LeCato II (c 1658 - )
     Augustin LeCatt was born a 1688. He was the son of John LeCato II.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Elizabeth Harmanson1,2

F, ID# 336, (a 1716 - )
     Elizabeth Harmanson was born a 1716 at Northampton Co, Virginia. She married John Kendall I, son of William Kendall III (the younger) and Jane "Joane" Parks / Parkes, on 15 Sep 1741 at Northampton Co, Virginia.

Children of Elizabeth Harmanson and John Kendall I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Thomas Kendall1

M, ID# 337, (a 1745 - )
Father:John Kendall I (c 1707 - )
Mother:Elizabeth Harmanson (a 1716 - )
     Thomas Kendall was born a 1745. He was the son of John Kendall I and Elizabeth Harmanson. Thomas Kendall married Anne (Unknown) a 1766.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Anne (Unknown)1

F, ID# 338, (a 1744 - )
     Anne (Unknown) was born a 1744. She married Thomas Kendall, son of John Kendall I and Elizabeth Harmanson, a 1766.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Sarah Martin1

F, ID# 339, (a 1721 - )
Father:Robert Martin (a 1690 - 1725)
Mother:Mary Downes (c 1695 - 27 Jan 1774)
     Sarah Martin was born a 1721. She was the daughter of Robert Martin and Mary Downes.

Citations

  1. [S49] Mark Clifford Lewis (1887 - 1970), "Kendall-Satchell-Martin Family."

Henry Southey I1,2,3,4

M, ID# 340, (c 1575 - b 1624/25)
     Henry Southey I was born c 1575 at Rimpton, Somerset Co, England. He married Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown) c 1600 at Rimpton, Somerset Co. Henry Southey I immigrated in 1622. He died b 1624/25 at Virginia.
      Henry Southey I came from Rimpton, Somersetshire, England on the ship Southampton in 1622 with his wife, six children, and ten servants. The official record in Jan1621/2 states "that one Mr. Henry Southey, a Somersetshire gentleman, did desire a patent for a particular Plantation in Virginia, to him and his associates undertaking to transport one hundred persons thither." The Council for Virginia in London promptly authorized his patent; his arrival in Virginia was noted by the Council and he was assigned at once "900 acres of land to be taken up in any place not already chosen."


Moody Miles sources:

[S556] Matthew M. Wise, Littleton Heritage: Some American Descendants of Col. Nathaniel Littleton (1605-1654) of Northampton Co., Virginia, and His Royal Forebears, p. 5 (Littleton Family - A-1 Nathaniel Littleton).
[S19] VA Hist Society Jennings Cropper Wise, Col. John Wise, His Ancestors and Descendants.
[S940] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 217 (Southey-Harman-Littleton Family).
[S887] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 7-71 (Muster of 1624/25).

Child of Henry Southey I and Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown)

Child of Henry Southey I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S33] Ralph T. Whitelaw, Virginia's Eastern Shore.
  3. [S159] "Virginia Families Genealogy."
  4. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

COL Nathaniel Littleton1,2

M, ID# 341, (c 1605 - 1656)
Father:Sir Edward Littleton (c 1551 - 1621)
Mother:Mary Walter (1567 - 1633)
     COL Nathaniel Littleton was born c 1605 at Hensley, Shropshire, North Wales. He was the son of Sir Edward Littleton and Mary Walter. COL Nathaniel Littleton immigrated in 1635. He married Ann Southey, daughter of Henry Southey I and Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown), b 1640. COL Nathaniel Littleton died in 1656 at Northampton Co, Virginia.
      Col Nathaniel Littleton was the progenitor of the Littletons of Virginia. Few immigrants to the American colonies have left as many clues to their European origins as Nathaniel Littleton who came to Virginia circa 1625. Evidence for identifying Nathaniel Littleton of Accomack Co, VA with the family of Littleton in Shropshire, England is found in the will of his widow Ann Littleton dated 28 Oct 1656: "if all my children die without issue, the real estate shall go to James Littleton, Esq., of Shropshire near Ludlow." James Littlleton was undoubtedly the brother of her deceased husband Nathaniel Littleton.

Col Nathaniel Littleton was chief magistrate of Accomack Co, VA in 1640; member of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1652; and Commander of Accomack.

Sources:

--Littleton Family of Accomack Co, VA, http://freepages.folklore.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~sturnbo/files/oldest/LittletonFamily.htm, accessed in 2016.

Children of COL Nathaniel Littleton and Ann Southey

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S159] "Virginia Families Genealogy."

Ann Southey1,2,3

F, ID# 342, (c 1610 - 1656)
Father:Henry Southey I (c 1575 - b 1624/25)
Mother:Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown) (a 1580 - )
     Ann Southey was born c 1610 at Rimpton, Somerset Co, England. She was the daughter of Henry Southey I and Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown). Ann Southey married Charles Harmar (Burgess), son of Arthur Harman, b 1635 at Accomack Co, Virginia. Ann Southey married COL Nathaniel Littleton, son of Sir Edward Littleton and Mary Walter, b 1640. Ann Southey died in 1656 at Magothy Bay, Northampton Co, Virginia. Her estate was probated on 28 Oct 1656 at Northampton Co, Virginia.
      Ann Southy was incorrectly noted as the daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth Southey of James City, VA in the Littleton Family of Virginia in the New England Historical and Genealogical Record of Oct 1887 which acknowledged she may have been Henry's daughter.

Child of Ann Southey and Charles Harmar (Burgess)

Children of Ann Southey and COL Nathaniel Littleton

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S14] Ellen Martin Research.
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Charles Harmar (Burgess)1,2

M, ID# 343, (a 1600 - b 1 Jun 1640)
Father:Arthur Harman (a 1557 - )
     Charles Harmar (Burgess) was born a 1600 at Berkshire, England. He was the son of Arthur Harman. Charles Harmar (Burgess) married Ann Southey, daughter of Henry Southey I and Elizabeth "Eldy" (Unknown), b 1635 at Accomack Co, Virginia. Charles Harmar (Burgess) died b 1 Jun 1640 at Northampton Co, Virginia.
      Charles Harmar was Lady Elizabeth Dale's overseer and, as successor to Henry Watkins, he managed her property at West and Shirley Hundred Island and on the Eastern Shore and perhaps on Jamestown Island. In Jan 1623 Harmar informed the General Court John Raimond had killed one of Lady Dale's cattle near the Chickahominy River. In Aug 1623 Charles returned to court to serve on a jury.

On 21 Jun 1624 Charles Harmar who gave his age as 24, testified in a slander suit that involved Capt. William Eppes and Ensign Thomas Savage and concerned an incident that had occurred on the Eastern Shore. By early 1625 Harmar was living on the Eastern Shore and shared a home with three other men. On 9 Feb 1625 he was still identified as Lady Dale's overseer when plans were made to settle certain debts attributable to the late George Thorpe. Charles was indebted to surgeon Thomas Bunn and his neighbor William Davis, whom he was ordered to pay.

On 3 Apr 1627 Charles Harmar, described as Lady Elizabeth Dale's former overseer, appeared before the General Court and under oath delivered to William Hambey an account of Lady Dale's personal estate, including cattle, tobacco, corn and other goods that had been in Harmar's possession since he had taken custody of them from Henry Watkins, his predecessor.

On 9 Dec 1628 Charles was given permission to plant a neck of land on the south side of Old Plantation Creek, Northampton, Co, VA -- property rumored to belong to Lady Elizabeth Dale. He was granted permission to acquire in his own name 100 acres of the tract "scituate and lying upon the said Old Plantation Creek, southerly upon a pond called Maggotty Bay pond and west upon the shore of the bay."

By 1632 Charles was a burgess and a commissioner of Accomack's local court. In Jun 1635 he patented a large tract of land on the Eastern Shore, using as headrights himself and his wife Ann, the daughter and final heir of the late Henry Southey of Jamestown Island.

Child of Charles Harmar (Burgess) and Ann Southey

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

MAJ Edmund Bowman1,2,3

M, ID# 344, (c 1620 - )
     MAJ Edmund Bowman was born c 1620 at England. He married Margaret (Unknown) c 1645. MAJ Edmund Bowman married Elizabeth (Unknown) c 1662 at Accomack Co, Virginia. MAJ Edmund Bowman married Eleanor Perry ? c 1674. MAJ Edmund Bowman married Katherine West b 17 May 1681. MAJ Edmund Bowman was buried at Accomack Co, Virginia. His estate was probated on 15 Mar 1692 at Accomack Co, Virginia.
      Maj. Edmund Bowman played a role in the failed attempt of Col Edmund Scarburgh, our 12th great grandfather, to forcibly annex part of Maryland into Virginia in the mid 1660s.

Children of MAJ Edmund Bowman and Margaret (Unknown)

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S160] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial Families.
  3. [S35] William Clayton Torrence (1184-1953), Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore.

Eleanor Perry ?1,2

F, ID# 345, (c 1625 - 1677)
     Eleanor Perry ? was born c 1625 at England. She married MAJ Edmund Bowman c 1674. Eleanor Perry ? died in 1677. Her estate was probated on 17 Apr 1677 at Accomack Co, Virginia.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Captain James Parmer Martin1

M, ID# 346, (c 1786 - 4 May 1825)
Father:John Martin II (a 1752 - 1792)
Mother:Parmer Satchell (c 1752 - 1806)
     Captain James Parmer Martin was born c 1786 at Northampton Co, Virginia. He was the son of John Martin II and Parmer Satchell. Captain James Parmer Martin married Rachel Ann Guthrie a 1810. Captain James Parmer Martin died on 4 May 1825 at Alexandria, Virginia.
      In 1810 James Parmer Martin, a sea captain, and his brother Thomas were left a bequest to be awarded to them at age 21 of $200 each by their great uncle and cousin Col James Martin (1728-1810); thus James was born in 1790 or later.

James was noted as selling two tracts of land in Worcestor Co, MD on 24 Jul 1807, after he and his brother divided their mother's estate. One tract was Whittington's Meadow which he sold to William Whittington for 5 shillings to settle disputes and controversies. The other was half of lot 48 in Snow Hill, Worcester Co, MD which he sold to Samuel R. Smith. James also sold a tract in that county in 1817.

In 1825 James died leaving three young daughters. 0n 6 May 1825, Friday, died on Wednesday morning last [i.e. 4 May 1825], Capt. James P. Martin, in the 39th year of his age. This researcher believes James Parmer Martin's widow remained in the Alexandria, VA area, likely with all three of her children -- Anne, Sarah and Nancy, because family letters written in 1831 to other Martin relatives in Alexandria request the recipient say hello to Anne and Sarah and because Nancy married a Lanphier and the Lanphier family was known to reside in Alexandria. Dates for James' family were established based on his estimated date of birth and his reported marriage date was ignored.


Detailed sources:

--Wesley E. Pippenger, Marriage and Death Notices from Alexandria, VA Newspapers, Vol. 1, Alexandria Herald section, pg. 471; Arlington, VA, W.E. Pippenger, 2005, District of Columbia Public Library (Death of Capt James P. Martin.)

Children of Captain James Parmer Martin and Rachel Ann Guthrie

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13

M, ID# 347, (12 May 1791 - 6 May 1835)
Father:John Martin II (a 1752 - 1792)
Mother:Parmer Satchell (c 1752 - 1806)
Charts:John Satchell Martin * lineage
     PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I was born on 12 May 1791 at Northampton Co, Virginia. He was the son of John Martin II and Parmer Satchell. PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I married Harriet Lanphier, daughter of Robert Going Lanphier I and Elizabeth 'Betsey' Sears, on 18 Oct 1814 at Alexandria, Virginia. PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I died on 6 May 1835 at Alexandria, Virginia, at age 43. He was buried at Trinity United Methodist Cemetery, Alexandria, Virginia.
      In 1795 brothers Thomas Littleton Martin and James Parmer Martin were to inherit from their aunt Nancy Martin silver shoe buckles, rings, real estate and other personal property -- the latter two of which were to be applied to their educations. In 1798 a guardian was appointed for Thomas. On 5 Jul 1799 his mother sold William Whittington the lands known as Whittington Meadow, Double Purchase and Addition to Double Purchase. In 1807 he and his brother divided their mother Parmer's estate. Thomas was thus an orphan at about age sixteen. In 1810 Thomas and his brother James were left a bequest to be awarded to them at age 21 of $200 each by their great uncle and cousin Col James Martin (1728-1810). Family tradition is Thomas and James were bilked from their inheritance (by Whittington relatives) and an uncle annexed their property and apprenticed Thomas in Alexandria, VA. Much later in 1826 Thomas sent correspondence to family and government officials in Accomack Co, VA to find out the terms of his [nonexistent] grandfather's will, request his uncle's will, find out what happened to the lands he and his brother were to receive from their aunt Nancy Martin, and find out how the Whittington family came to possess his father's land.

Thomas left Northampton Co, VA for Alexandria, VA in 1812 and was bound to a hatter; he ultimately did become an Alexandria hatter. Of note apparently a different Thomas Martin, son of James -- not John, was bound to Ezra Kinsey that year to learn the trade of tanner and currier (recorded 16 Nov 1812); unlike all the other apprenticeships no age was given. This was the year a British squadron captured Alexandria causing $100,000 damage and raiding warehouses for supplies.

By the time Thomas arrived in Alexandria various people with the surname Martin already resided in the city and a number resided there during the time Thomas lived there. A Jane Martin married a Michael Broad on 14 Jan 1804 with Charles Pascoe as a bondsman. A William Martin noted as a sea captain was living there with a total of 3 in his home in 1808. A blacksmith named William Martin and a Henry Martin with a total of 6 in their household already resided in the city in 1808. A free colored man named John Martin noted as a Sh. Carpenter living with 2 free colored persons lived there in 1808. A Priscilla Martin noted as a washerwoman was living alone in 1808. A Nancy Martin with no noted occupation was residing with William Glover, who was over age 16, and 1 other person in 1808; Nancy and William Glover married 12 Apr 1814. A James Martin was a bondsman for the marriage of Sampson Lamboy and Letty Cole on 5 May 1813. A Susan Martin married James Brown on 15 Nov 1817 with John Chauncey as a bondsman. An Ann Martin married James Walker on 29 Mar 1823. A David Martin married Sarah Wells Harper on 22 Jun 1824 with Edward Green as a bondsman. An Elizabeth Martin married Samuel Cronmiller on 20 May 1830 with James Simms as a bondsman. A Nancy Martin married Robert Williams 13 Apr 1842 with William Powell as a bondsman. A Mary E. Martin married Frederick Jackson on 29 Jul 1847 with John M. Magor as a bondsman. No evidence indicated these people were relatives of Thomas, but they might have moved to Alexandria from the Eastern Shore and be related to him.

Thomas and Harriet Lanphier were married by Rev. Joseph Rowan and the marriage bondsmen were Thomas L. Martin and Robert G. Lanphier, his father-in-law. Over the years, Thomas's middle name was also spelled Lyttleton and Liyttleton. Thomas, Harriet and their children were very religious; the children were all known for their pious religious lives and the help they rendered others.

During the War of 1812, from 15 Jul 1813 until 28 Jul 1813 and from 19 Aug 1814, the day after his marriage, until 1 Oct 1814, Thomas served as an infantry private in the First Regiment, District of Columbia Militia, Capt Charles McKnight's Company, commanded by Col William A. Dangerfield. Thomas volunteered in the Independant Blues of Alexandria, VA under McKnight and fought in the battle of the White House at North Point near Baltimore, MD; he was honorably discharged in Alexandria on 1 Oct 1814. He served on the Independent Blues election committee in 1821. Because Thomas served in the War of 1812, his son John later received bounty land and his widow received a pension in recognition of his services.

For twenty years Thomas was a hat manufacturer and fur dealer in Alexandria, VA. He had good intellect, was cultivated in reading and was respected and esteemed for integrity in business transactions. At the turn of the century in 1800 following a rapid growth spurt there were about 800 buildings and less that 8,000 people in Alexandria. Thomas lived and worked at the focal point of town life -- the market and the wharves. Market square was where fairs, political events and produce markets were held and owning a shop on the edge of this square provided him prime retail space. The water front was bustling with both large ships and small fishing craft, with nearly one thousand vessels docking annually at the wharves.

Thomas' hattery where he lived and sold beaver and wool hats for both adults and children was at the southeast corner of Fairfax Street between King and Prince streets, one block south of the central market place and two blocks west from the thriving water front. He had a second hattery which may have been at his King Street location described later. Thomas had numerous orphan boys bound to him to learn the hattery trade; the term "orphan" did not necessarily mean the child had no parents, because John Purdy for example was bound out by his mother. These indentures included on 11 May 1813 James Yost, an orphan age 14; on 22 Oct 1814 John Burdy, an orphan age 15; in Feb 1816 Jane Bonsal had Norris, a black boy, bound to Thomas specifically to learn pulling and butting; on 1 May 1816 William Burke, an orphan age 18; on Dec 1825 George Wiley an orphan age 15; and on 25 Dec 1826 Joseph Flood an orphan age 18.

In Jan 1817 a tragic fire swept through Alexandria destroying fifty-three buildings south of the market to the water front. The accidental fire originated in a cabinet maker's workshop which was located at the northeast portion of a square bounded by both of Thomas' hattery properties. The fire started southwest of his current hattery and moved southeast toward his other hattery property and the water front. The older hattery property was likely destroyed, as every "house on the west side of Fairfax Street south to Prince Street was simultaneously wrapped in flames and speedily consumed," which corresponds to his property's location.

On 5 Sep 1818 Thomas purchased a lot from Thomas and Eleanor Preston in the heart of the old Alexandria City, DC on the east side of Pitt Street between Cameron and King streets, a block west of the town's market square; what he did with this lot is unknown.

Thomas' hattery was likely impacted by the 1819 economic panic which severely hurt Alexandria; numerous homes and businesses were auctioned to pay debts. At at a meeting of Friendship Fire Company on 10 Jan 1820 Thomas was elected as a Regulator according to the 4 Feb 1820 Alexandria Herald. In 1820 Thomas and Francis Murphy were assessed a value of $3,500 for a house and lot at King and Fairfax Streets and Thomas was assessed separately for a lot at Pitt Street.

Thomas was elected a regulator of the Star Fire Company in 1821 in Alexandria, VA and subordinate director of the Friendship Fire Company in Alexandria, VA in 1822 and again in 1823. His former commander Charles McKnight was also a member of the latter organization. The Friendship Fire Company, reputedly organized by Gen George Washington in 1774, was a volunteer brotherhood replete with rituals and totems for the protection of Alexandria structures.

In 1823 he leased his combination residence and business location on Fairfax Street to John Rumney, another hatter. Thomas moved his business four doors up from this corner to the old John Runnells office on King Street, which put him on the south side of the market square.

While living in Alexandria, Thomas maintained correspondence with his Satchell and Joynes cousins on the Eastern Shore. Incoming letters that survived provide interesting information about the times and extended family members. On 21 Apr 1826 Christopher Stockley Satchell wrote from Accomack to his first cousin Thomas. Christopher noted he forwarded Thomas' previous letter to ask his sister Sarah Satchell Simpkins [sic] (wife of John Simkins) and Nathaniel Holland [no further data] when Thomas' uncle Robert Martin had died. The plantation White Hall was stated as the burial place for Thomas' aunt Nancy Martin. Christopher told Thomas their relatives were at John Simkins' home for the marriage of Ann Dunton [possibly a daughter of Jacob Dunton and Elizabeth Satchell] to Dr George Tankard [no further data] both of Northampton Co, VA, and that Harriet Holland recently married John Thomas [no further data] near Frank Town. Christopher said the will of his wife, Thomas' aunt Ann Bell Satchell who was confined to bed, was sent via John Simpkins [sic] to Thomas.

Thomas served as a marriage bondsman in Alexandria for James Garrison and Elizabeth Kilham on 22 May 1817 and for the marriage of his niece Ann G. Martin and his wife's first cousin John Lanphier on 23 Dec 1830.

Thomas received a 14 Mar 1831 letter from his niece Ann Guthrie Martin from Winding Dale, Onacock, VA who thanked him for money he sent and mentioned visiting cousin Belle [Ann Bell Satchell Joynes 1792-1862] -- Ann G. Martin's 2nd cousin -- and Mr Joynes (Belle's husband Thomas R. Joynes.) The majority of Ann's letter appears to focus on the family of
Christopher Stockley Satchell 1766-1830 and Anne "Nancy" Bell Satchell birth estimated in 1760 and their two youngest sons William A. Satchell ~1803-1830 and Christopher "Kit" Columbus Satchell ~1804-1864. Ann reported "Nancy most cordially joined me in love to you .... she is much cast down in the loss of her dear husband and son William." Nancy is most likely Anne "Nancy" Bell Satchell [mother of Anne Belle (Satchell) Joynes] whose husband Christopher S. Satchell died 1830 and son William A. Satchell died circa 1831. Ann discussed the sudden death of cousin William Satchell, who Ann said often spoke of Thomas; this William was most likely the William A. born circa 1803 son of Christopher and Ann Bell Satchell -- and already mentioned as deceased in her letter. Ann stated cousin Christopher [likely Christopher Columbus Satchell born ~1805 and the brother of William A. Satchell] was farming.

Some years later the same John Simkins noted above in the 1826 Satchell letter wrote Thomas from Eastview on the Eastern Shore on 18 Dec 1832 discussing the current cholera epidemic. John noted his wife Sarah "Sally" Satchell, Thomas' first cousin, was regaining her health. A Mary Harmenson [no further data] sent her greetings to Thomas.

From 4 Sep 1832 until 24 Mar 1834 Levin S. Joynes II circa 1792-1845 and his wife Mary "Maria" Stringer Satchell born circa 1798, both of whom were cousins of Thomas, wrote three letters to Thomas that survived. The primary theme was Levin's poverty and the health of family members. Levin spoke of his unfortunate failure and the collapse of his business; noted they were “...as poor as it is possible for people to be...” and had sold all their possessions; “his wife has with her dear mother endeavored to bind up the broken heart;” said he could not sell his crops; and above all he placed his faith in God. Given that cholera just swept through Shore, they may have lost one or more children to disease as well. Family news included his mother-in-law Elizabeth B. Stringer Satchell born circa 1770 and her daughter Susanna S. Satchell circa 1802-1840 visited and his brother Thomas R. Joynes 1789-1858 and his wife Ann Bell Satchell 1792-1862 had a new son born in Mar 1834. Levin noted “my Anna Satchell's health [is] much improved, but she will hardly ever be well again;” this researcher believes Anna is likely a daughter of Levin and Maria who did not survive to be included in her grandmother's 1843 will which specifically stated Maria was childless. Finally Levin notes "...and mother, Maria Gunn/Gusun[?] unites with me in love to you all;” this researcher believes this refers to his wife and her full name is Mary “Maria” Gunn/Gusun Stringer Satchell. By 1834 Levin signed his letters as Levin S. Joynes, Sr, likely to distinguish him from younger cousins with the same name.

Furthermore, when Levin and Maria asked Thomas in their letters to give love and affection to Ann and Sarah when he saw them doubtless refers to Thomas' nieces by those names. In 1825 Thomas' sea captain brother James Palmer Martin died leaving three young daughters. This researcher believes either the family was already living or visiting in the Alexandria area or James Parmer Martin's widow resettled in the area, likely with all three of her children -- Ann, Sarah and Nancy. Although daughter Nancy is not mentioned in these 1832-1834 letters, Nancy also likely moved to Alexandria and had already married into the Lanphier family of Alexandria.

In 1824 and 1827 large fires again ravaged the city which likely took their toll on Thomas' business forcing him to sign promissary notes totaling $1,264. The 1827 fire started in a cabinet maker's shop bounded by a square of Fairfax, Prince, Royal and King streets, closest to the latter two streets. As reported in the 23 Jan 1827 Alexandria Gazette, by heroic measures Thomas' home fronting King street was saved but his outbuildings perhaps consisting of a kitchen and stable were either burned or pulled down to prevent the fire from spreading.

This is the point in his life when Thomas began investigating the possibility he should have inherited land on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. He also began a 1832-1834 correspondence with his cousin Levin S. Joynes and the latter sold some hats for Thomas in Accomack Co, VA.

On 1 Mar 1827 Thomas and his wife Harriet sold their property noted as being a home and lot (19 feet by 161 feet) with outstanding loans of $1264 on the south side of King Street, sixty feet to the east of Fairfax Street to Robert J. Taylor, all of Alexandria, DC to settle debts of $1,264 to George R. Gauther[?] of Baltimore, MD.

The account for Thomas with John Wheeler, likely a schoolmaster or tutor, shows tuition, copy books and school books for his sons John Satchell Martin and Robert Lanphier Martin for Dec 1827 - Jul 1829 totaled $78.53 with payment by cash, note and one hat.

In 1828 John Rumney moved to Thomas' business location on King Street and in 1832 a cholera epidemic swept through town.

Thomas' wallet also contained a 2 Mar 1831 receipt for purchasing hat stocks and tools for $798 -- $475 paid by notes and the remainder billed to him for all the hat-making tools of William Wilson, implying Thomas had lost tools in one of the fires or had been forced to sell his tools. His father-in-law Robert Going Lanphier senior and James Galt were witnesses.

Thomas was one of thirty-five members of the Alexandria Masonic Lodge to which George Washington had belonged. Thomas attended a Lodge 39 Meeting in Dec 1826, when due to bad weather only the installation of officers occurred. He was a member of Evangelical Lodge 6 where he was listed as a master mason; this lodge was dissolved in 1835. Thomas was also a member of the Methodist Church. Thomas declined the nomination for the Common Council of the second ward according to the 3 Mar 1832 Alexandria Gazette. Thomas was added to the Board of Health for a year as noted in a 2 Jul 1834 notice in the Alexandria Gazette.

Thomas' leather wallet held a number of interesting original documents that were examined at Elizabeth Perry's home in 1985. He had one share of Middle Turnpike Company stock due to mature in 1830 and five shares of Alexandria Canal Company stock. The 1843 seven-mile Alexandria Canal had a 300 by 700 feet docking basin in Old Town Alexandria, VA and a canal with four locks that paralleled the Potomac River from Alexandria to Georgetown, Washington DC. The canal played a vital role in the city's growth from 1843 when the first boat went all the way through the canal until 1886 when its aqueduct bridge crossing the Potomac ruptured.

In Alexandria in Sep 1833 Thomas wrote, "Rev C. A. Davis Dear Sir: Having concluded to withdraw myself from the Methodist Episcopal Church. I therefore request you to consider me no longer a member. Your respectfully Tho L. Martin." An 1834 note signed by Mr. Webster states, "Thomas L. Martin, an acceptable member of the Methodist Protestant Church, being desirous of removing from this station, is entitled to this testimonial for the undersigned; Alexandria Station; 15 October 1834." In 1834 Thomas "moved to Washington DC," although this may have meant he was living in that portion of Alexandria which had been ceded to Washington DC to form a portion of the capital city.

Thomas paid in full $10 for lot 86 in the Bury Ground of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Alexandria on 14 Sep 1821; Thomas Preston from whom he bought land in 1818 was one of the signatories. How the lot was used in not known but it may have been renumbered and thus be where he was buried.

In early 1835 Thomas caught pleurisy from which he never recovered; by 5 May he had been ill a week according to a letter from William Lanphier, likely Thomas' brother-in-law, to Thomas' son John Satchell Martin. The July 1835 inventory of Thomas' $1497 estate includes a huge hat inventory; kitchenware; considerable nice furniture, carpets, and appointments; and a slave valued at $500.

Although someone with Thomas' name was listed at the Loudoun Park Cemetery, Baltimore, MD, Thomas Littleton Martin's remains are in Row F, Lot 17 Trinity United Methodist Church Cemetery, near Wilkes Street in Alexandria, VA near the middle of the cemetery; there is an unmarked grave next to his which could be one of his children about whom little is known. Trinity United Methodist Church was founded in Alexandria in 1774. Dates for Thomas' birth and death were on the hand-written draft for his tombstone apparently drafted in 1852 by his son John at the second written request of his mother. The draft epitaph indicated he was an Alexandrian for 21 years; honest and intelligent, esteemed by his fellow citizens; humble and obedient and enjoyed the favor of God.

In 1791 Alexandria had become part of the new District of Columbia and remained as such until 1846 when it was returned to Virginia, thus references to Thomas living and dying in Washington DC refer to Alexandria being part of the District at that time.

Sources:
--Elizabeth Harriet Perry (1904-1989) draft DAR papers for descent from her 6th great grandfather Col William Kendall, copy in possession of Virginia Winslett, draft stops at Thomas Littleton Martin. Proofs included Colonial Dames paper #7077 of Elizabeth Harriet Perry with Col George Moffett ancestor, notarized statements by John Martin Perry, notarized copy of paper for William James Perry & Martha Harriet Ruff Martin marriage, Wallace Genealogy p. 63, Lanphier family papers, various deeds, and the wills of Nancy Martin, Parmer Martin and Southey Satchell. Account receipts and letters noted in the possession of Virginia Winslett.
--Northampton Co, VA Wills 1792-1793, vol 29 , p 473, 11 Sep 1795 (will of Nancy Martin)
--Worcester Co, MD Deeds, Vol S, 25 May 1798, p. 220 and Vol T, 5 Jul 1799, p. 192 (Elizbeth Perry 's sources for Thomas L. Martin; exact deed info unknown)
--Northampton Co, VA Will and Inventories, # 21, 10 Apr 1759, p. 420 (will of Southey Satchell)
--Northampton Co, VA Will and Inventories 1802-1807 , Vol 32, 12 Jan 1807, p. 575 (will of Parmer Satchell)
--District of Columbia Book D 2. folio 18, 4 Apr 1827 (Martin-Taylor deed)
--Portion of War of 1812 Widow's Pension Application, #5923?, 1871 (service time computation record for Thomas L. Martin)
--Inventory of Thomas L. Martin's estate, [Will?] Book 5, # 1807, Washington County (meaning Alexandria City in the Washington District of Colunbia), 15 Jul 1835
--Martin Family Bible, referenced in1840 letter from Robert Lanphier Martin to his brother John Satchell Martin in discussion regarding their father's death; bible location unknown and no known copies.
--T. Michael Miller, editor, Pen Portraits of Alexandria, Virginia 1739-1900, Heritage Books, Bowie, MD, 1987, p. 112-113. (1827 Alexandria, VA fire destroys Martin's property.)

Children of PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I and Harriet Lanphier

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S75] Stephen P. Dorsey, Ralph Cole Hall, Deering Davis, Alexandria Houses 1750 - 1830.
  3. [S80] Franklin Longdon Brockett, Lodge of Washington.
  4. [S1] "Virginia Winslett Research."
  5. [S183] Historic Alexandria Canal articles, Alexdandria Gazette Packet, 1988 - 1993.
  6. [S238] William Francis Smith, T. Michael Miller, Alexandria, DC 1820-1830.
  7. [S275] Alexandria Gazette Packet, 19 Nov 1998.
  8. [S277] Trinity Methodist Church, Alexandria Gazette Packet, 4 Mar 1999.
  9. [S329] Tim Dennee, T. Michael Miller, "Alexandria, VA in the 1820s."
  10. [S514] Martin-Lanphier Family Record.
  11. [S83] Louis Martin Research.
  12. [S598] Wesley E. Pippenger, Alexandria Tombstone Inscriptions.
  13. [S599] T. Michael Miller, Alexandria Minister Returns.

Harriet Lanphier1,2,3,4,5,6,7

F, ID# 348, (13 Mar 1795 - 6 Nov 1885)
Father:Robert Going Lanphier I (18 Sep 1765 - 27 Aug 1846)
Mother:Elizabeth 'Betsey' Sears (8 Mar 1774 - 6 Jun 1853)
Charts:John Satchell Martin * lineage
     Harriet Lanphier was born on 13 Mar 1795 at Alexandria, Virginia. She was the daughter of Robert Going Lanphier I and Elizabeth 'Betsey' Sears. Harriet Lanphier married PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I, son of John Martin II and Parmer Satchell, on 18 Oct 1814 at Alexandria, Virginia. Harriet Lanphier died on 6 Nov 1885 at Baltimore, Maryland, at age 90. She was buried at Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland.
      Harriet Lanphier may have moved her young family to her father Robert Going Lanphier's home after her husband's death in 1835. In 1838 she received a letter from a John (?) Wood, apparently a relative, stating he had collected the rent and paid the taxes on her Alexandria, VA property and sending love to her father; that year a John Wood petitioned regarding a runaway slave in Alexandria.

Harriet rented a home on the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington DC from the former President John Quincy Adams -- who served as US President from 1825-1829 and died in 1848 -- from at least 1842 until about September 1844; over a year later she still owed about $200 back rent. Harriet moved to Baltimore, MD in June 1849 and lived with her daughter Elizabeth Parmer Martin at 502 West Fayette Street.

Based on her husband's military service, in 1850 Harriet was told she could receive forty acres of government bounty land. Charles Fletcher, who claimed he served in her husband's company and could prove her husband's service based on company rolls in his possession, offered to procure the land warrant for her for $2, but apparently her efforts failed. According to a 12 Apr 1878 letter from her son John S. Martin in Staunton, VA to his sister (likely Elizabeth who seemed to attend to their mother's financial affairs) the bounty land warrant was purchased and issued to John followed by the issuance of a land patent to him. What became of the land is unknown.

Harriet wrote her son John on 26 Nov 1852 and speaks of his wife Susan teaching their children at home, notes Harriet's sister Martha is apparently caring for their weak mother, the families of her sons William and Robert are well. She mentioned she is still waiting for him to write an inscription suitable for his father's tomb which she had selected when she was living in Alexandria, VA where her husband died.

On 20 Jul 1874 Harriet wrote one of her daughters [name not stated but likely Martha Virginia] referring to that daughter and Lizzie [likely Harriet's daughter] traveling to visit Harriet's sisters Mary and Martha and to son John's illness and his wife Susan and daughter Sue. Harriet was then living with her son William and his wife Carrie and their children in Philadelphia, PA.

In 1871 Harriet submitted a widow's claim under the Act of 1871 that was rejected based on the length of her husband's military service. On 5 Apr 1878 Harriet's daughter Elizabeth P. Martin requested John West in Alexandria procure Harriet's widow's pension for her under the Act of 9 Mar 1878, a service for which she paid him $5. On 15 Apr 1878 Harriet filled out her pension application and on 8 Aug 1878 her pension request was approved with retroactive payment from 9 Mar 1878 of $8 monthly and an added back payment from 4 Sep to 4 Dec 1885 of $24.

By 1870 Harriet was living in Baltimore, MD. Harriet age 75 had removed 4 years off her age and about 19, 17 and 15 off her daughters' ages depicting them as all born after their father's 1835 death. Also in the household are Catherine Burke, a servant age 7; Anna Barry a dress maker age 35 and Anna's daughter Charlotte age 13 and son Makel age 10. Harriet now age 85 and her single daughters were living on Fayette St in Baltimore, MD a decade later and miraculously, her three daughters had not aged a day. Daughters Elizabeth and Harriet were employed as teachers. Also living in the household was Matilda Romaine, age 18, likely either a servant or boarder.

Harriet's son John wrote for her birthday in 1883 "truely you are blessed in that old age finds you in the midst of your children and waited on as you have need....The world has passed in rapid change before you and its changes have gone on much as before the eighty-eight years past commenced and as they will be repeated in the years to come. So history repeats itself."

On 11 Feb 1886 the US Treasury paid Harriet's daughter Elizabeth Martin $16.80 on Interior Warrant #5556 on account of Harriet Martin's sickness and burial.


Source:

--Harriet Martin obituaries, 1885 (newpaper names & dates removed), copy in possession of Virginia Winslett.
--General Land Office, vol 279, p. 132 (military service bounty land issued to John S. Martin based on service of Thomas L. Martin)
--Portion of War of 1812 Widow's Pension Application, #5923?, 1871 (service time computation record for Thomas L. Martin)
--War of 1812 Widow's Pension Application, # 7954, Baltimore, MD, 15 Apr 1878 (application of Harriet Martin)
--Department of Interior, pension #7594 approval, 8 Aug 1878 (widow's pension for Harriet Martin; witnesses daughters Elizabeth and Martha Virginia Martin.)

Children of Harriet Lanphier and PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S12] "Ella Virginia Auguste Perry (1870-1971) Research: Collection of hand-written Lanphier, Martin, Perry, Russell and Other Family Documents."
  3. [S199] Samuel Pearce May (b. 1828), Richard Sares (Sears) Descendants.
  4. [S514] Martin-Lanphier Family Record.
  5. [S83] Louis Martin Research.
  6. [S570] Thomas L. Martin Records.
  7. [S599] T. Michael Miller, Alexandria Minister Returns.

Rev John / Jno Satchell Martin1,2,3,4,5

M, ID# 349, (7 Sep 1815 - 8 Jul 1888)
Father:PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I (12 May 1791 - 6 May 1835)
Mother:Harriet Lanphier (13 Mar 1795 - 6 Nov 1885)
Charts:Virginia Custis Winslett lineage
John Satchell Martin * lineage
     Rev John / Jno Satchell Martin was born on 7 Sep 1815 at Alexandria, Virginia. He was the son of PVT Thomas Littleton Martin I and Harriet Lanphier. Rev John / Jno Satchell Martin married Susan Paulding Ruff, daughter of Judge John Milschleggel Ruff and Martha Wallace, on 10 Mar 1838 at Lexington, Rockbridge Co, Virginia. Rev John / Jno Satchell Martin died on 8 Jul 1888 at Baltimore, Maryland, at age 72. He was buried at Loudon Park Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland. His estate was probated on 3 Sep 1888.
      Rev John Satchell Martin was one of the great leaders of the Methodist Church.

As a boy John used to hitch his sleigh to the back of wagons on King Street in Alexandria, VA. From childhood he enjoyed the educational advantages of the Alexandria city schools. His scholastic training was completed with the distinguished Quaker schoolmaster Benjamin Hallowell at 609 Oronoco Street, Alexandria under whom he spent the last four years of his schooling. John became a man of culture, continuing to read and study throughout his life. John entered the Methodist ministry at age seventeen in 1832, licensed as a minister in 1835, as a deacon in 1837, and as an elder in 1839. In 1867 Randolph Macon College, Boyston, VA bestowed on him the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity based on his work and study and the promise of even greater work to come.

John's presence commanded attention and respect. He was tall and statuesque with a grave, dignified Roman-shaped face, piercing eyes, firm lips, strong under jaw and gray hair brushed back from a noble forehead. He combined strength with tenderness and courage with prudence; he valued commendation but despised flattery. He was systematic and well organized. John had strong family ties. With his family he was not demonstrative but had a deep and abiding affection for his wife and children. In 1840 he indicated to his mother that he planned to pay for the education of his siblings Thomas, William, Elizabeth and Martha.

In 1835 John received a reply from Snow Hill, MD, the original American seat of the Martin family, that about 1832 correspondence had been received in Snow Hill inquiring as to the location of the oldest American heir of a landed Scottish gentleman who was deceased. Dr. John S. Martin with his eldest son John Church Martin and Benjamin H. Martin with his eldest son George Henry Martin, all of Snow Hill, replied as being possible heirs. John Satchell Martin was advised in 1832 that his father Thomas Littleton Martin could likely have been the eldest survivor at the time of the Scotchman's death. However, the inheritance was not to occur until the widow of the Scottish gentleman died and the heir also had to move to Scotland and occupy the land.

Over his lifetime John was appointed to twenty-eight ministerial locations in Virginia and Maryland. He was initially appointed junior minister in Lexington, VA responsible for a circuit of churches in Rockbridge Co, VA in 1835. He was appointed junior pastor in Staunton, VA in 1837. As was the custom at that time, young preachers lived in the homes of well-to-do members of their church. While staying in Lexington at the hospitable home of John M. Ruff he met John's daughter Susan. Their courtship and marriage was ideal; they were married by Rev A. A. Eskridge. The 28 Feb 1838 marriage date noted for John is likely when he applied for his marriage license. Accustomed to all the comforts of a genteel home, Susan valiantly shared the work and privations of the ministry and became known for her unfailing courage and devotion.

John's next appointment in 1838 was to the Botetourt Circuit which had 28 preaching locations. The next move was 200 miles to Lewistown, PA which had to be traveled to by wagon in 1840. Their next move was to Lewisburg, WV. He was then sent to Winchester, VA in 1842, 1852, and 1883; Front Royal, VA in 1843; Baltimore, MD in 1844, 1847, 1855, 1860, 1865, 1870, and 1888; Leesburg, VA in 1845; Jefferson (Jefferson, Powhatan Co, VA or Jefferson, the former name for West Falls Church, VA) in 1851; Loudoun Co, VA in 1854; and Roanoke, VA in 1858. He was located in Staunton, VA for 10 years, including apparently the Civil War years when he worked in Lexington, VA and Botecourt and Highland counties and supported himself; he again lived in Staunton from 1875 to 1878, which were years of prosperity in the church.

In 1850 John age 34 and his family were residing in Baltimore, MD. About 1850 John applied for and received his father's bounty land based on military service. According to a 12 Apr 1878 letter from her son John S. Martin to his sister the bounty land warrant was purchased and issued to John followed by the issuance of a land patent to him.

John had a very large church in Baltimore, MD before the war. He worked hard during the 1850s to hold the church together. When the church split came and the Northern Methodists took over the Baltimore churches, John moved back to Lexington, VA. The Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church included northern and western Virginia as far south as Lexington. During and after the war his churches were generally in the Shenandoah Valley as far north as Winchester, VA. In 1865 he took an oath of loyalty to the United States. In Oct 1865 John moved to Baltimore, MD and opened a new place of worship at the Central Station where his son-in-law Rev. William James Perry was pastor. John then returned to Lexington, VA before moving to Alexandria, VA in 1866 where he revitalized the church in the post-war years. He moved to Rockingham Co, VA in 1874 and 1879.

John was known as a circuit rider -- trained to endure hardship and privation. In their itinerant life of constant travel moving from country cottage to district parsonage, and then to the more stately homes of the chief station in Baltimore, MD, John and his wife never publicly complained. Privately as the years went on John noted to his mother that the life of a traveling preacher was wearing on him. He held many elective church conference offices as delegate and elder and served as Secretary of the Baltimore Methodist Conference from 1853 until 1888 and presiding elder for years.

John was known as honest, calm, quiet, sincere, pious and an energetic devotee to his work. He was affectionately known as the encyclopedia of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Nothing delighted him more than to recall the days of his early work, the historic achievements of Methodism, and the lives of departed leaders who he remembered through personal contact. John was known as a clear and great speaker. A ready debater, his discussions rested on firm and deep convictions. He had a distaste for trivial conversation and social events.

In 1860 John, a clergyman age 45, and his family were living in Baltimore, MD with John's sisters Elizabeth and Harriet, who did not age during the next two decades of censuses. Also in the household were two black servants, Bettie Harper age 12 and Andrew Edmunsen age 16.

In Mar 1860 a J. Martin paid James C. Huff, the jailer, $2.48 for arresting, committing, punishing, whipping and releasing from jail in June 1859 a black boy named Norris; this price included the services of three witnesses. This seems to be an act most out of character for John, but the receipt was with his personal papers.

By 1870 John, a minister age 54, and his family resided in Laurel, Prince George Co, MD along with Ann Jackson, a cook age 30. John was doing remarkably well with $8000 in real estate and $1000 in personal property. John's son Thomas was farming the land and his son Asbury had also become a minister. Living next door was his daughter Harriet with her husband William James Perry, another minister who was wealthy.

John relocated his family to Staunton, Augusta Co, VA by 1880 where his daughters Susan and Henrietta were teachers. Also in the household was Addie Lee, a 19 year-old mulatto servant, the same age as his daughter Addie also living at home.

John died after a long, painful illness while serving at St. Paul's Church, Baltimore, MD; his death occurred at the parsonage at 1050 West Fayette Street. He was diagnosed as having hemorrhaging kidneys and a carbuncle on his back. A carbuncle is a painful cluster of boils or abscesses caused by bacteria and connected to each other under the skin. His Baltimore funeral was attended by the bishop and numerous ministers who extolled his hard, loving Christian work, and a memorial service was held in Staunton, VA; there were numerous obituaries. His will (in the possession of Janet Broadbent) was proved 3 September 1888 and lists his children.

Sources:

--Staunton, VA Will Book 3, 3 Sep 1888, p. 321-324 (will of John S. Martin)
--bond, deacon and elder license and other church papers, promissary note, receipts, Baltimore Confence address, 1865 loyalty oath, honorary doctorate degree, Baltimore Conference obituary, Staunton Vindicator obituary, the Baltomorean obituary, other newspaper obituaries, and numerous personal letters (originals apparently destroyed; copies in possession of Virginia Winslett
--General Land Office, vol 279, p. 132 (military service bounty land issued circa 1850 to John S. Martin based on service of Thomas L. Martin)
--Bible Record for John Satchell Martin and Susan Paulding Ruff with children's names and birth & christening dates. Unknown author but likely Rev John Satchell Martin or Susan Paulding Ruff because they were very religious and would have recorded christening dates in their bible. Also appears to have been copied from bible because includes births, marriage, death sections -- the latter two having only their own marriage and the death of their youngest child in 1863 which was the last entry. Only includes one generation. Found with the papers of John Satchell Martin in the possession of Elizabeth Perry (1904-1989); copy in possession of Virginia Winslett. Further, in 1964 Elizabeth Perry had a notarized copy made, and the notary stated "from the appearance of the paper, the ink and handwrting, the said instrument is quite old, and was probably copied from a family bible."
--Family Record for John Satchell Martin and Susan Paulding Ruff with children's and spouses' names; children's birth, marriage and death dates; only includes one generation; last entry was 1923; unknown author but writing is similar to writing of Sarah Jane Corner Martin Beall (1851-1943); found with the papers of John Satchell Martin in the possession of Elizabeth Perry (1904-1989); copy in possession of Virginia Winslett.
--Martin Family Memoir, written by J. C. B. (Sarah Jane Corner Martin Beall 1851-1943) daughter of John Satchell Martin, 30 May 1939; found with the papers of John Satchell Martin in the possession of Elizabeth Perry (1904-1989); copy in possession of Virginia Winslett.

Children of Rev John / Jno Satchell Martin and Susan Paulding Ruff

Citations

  1. [S12] "Ella Virginia Auguste Perry (1870-1971) Research: Collection of hand-written Lanphier, Martin, Perry, Russell and Other Family Documents."
  2. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  3. [S75] Stephen P. Dorsey, Ralph Cole Hall, Deering Davis, Alexandria Houses 1750 - 1830.
  4. [S199] Samuel Pearce May (b. 1828), Richard Sares (Sears) Descendants.
  5. [S514] Martin-Lanphier Family Record.

Sarah Bowman1,2

F, ID# 350, (c 1645 - b 1679)
Father:MAJ Edmund Bowman (c 1620 - )
Mother:Margaret (Unknown) (c 1625 - )
     Sarah Bowman was born c 1645. She was the daughter of MAJ Edmund Bowman and Margaret (Unknown). Sarah Bowman married COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess), son of COL Nathaniel Littleton and Ann Southey, c 1665. Sarah Bowman died b 1679.

Children of Sarah Bowman and COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess)

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

COL Edward Littleton1,2

M, ID# 351, (c 1640 - 1663)
Father:COL Nathaniel Littleton (c 1605 - 1656)
Mother:Ann Southey (c 1610 - 1656)
     COL Edward Littleton was born c 1640. He was the son of COL Nathaniel Littleton and Ann Southey. COL Edward Littleton married Sarah Douglas in 1658. COL Edward Littleton married Frances Robbins on 7 Mar 1661 at Hungars Parish, Northampton Co, Virginia. COL Edward Littleton died in 1663.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S158] Dr Robert Patterson Robins, Littleton Family.

Sarah Littleton1,2

F, ID# 352, (1669 - 18 Apr 1720)
Father:COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) (1642 - Sep 1679)
Mother:Sarah Bowman (c 1645 - b 1679)
     Sarah Littleton was born in 1669 at Northampton Co, Virginia. She was the daughter of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman. Sarah Littleton married Adam Michael, son of CPT John Michael II (1st son John) and Elizabeth Thorowgood, c 1686. Sarah Littleton married COL John Custis III (of Wilsonia), son of MG John Custis II (of Arlington) and Elizabeth Robinson, c 1693. Sarah Littleton died on 18 Apr 1720 at Northampton Co, Virginia. Her estate was probated on 17 May 1720 at Northampton Co, Virginia.
      Sarah Littleton had no children by John Custis, but there were numerous mulatto slaves bequeathed in her will. Sarah made a will on 14 April 1720 at Northampton Co, VA. She was shown as Sarah Custis, widow of John Custis, Esquire. My body to the earth to be laid by my late dec'd husband John Custis, Esquire. To my son-in-law (step-son) John Custis my silver dish and my gold ring with the posey, "S and J live happily to keep for my sake." To my daughter-in-law Sorrowful Margaret Kendall my diamond ring with a christial in the middle and my horse "Forrester." To my grandson Custis Kendall negro boy Solomon, silver tankard and silver salt seller, but if he dies under 21 then to his sister Leah Kendall. To Littleton Kendall negro woman Dennis, but if he dies under 21 then to his three sisters, viz., Ann, Peggy and Leah. To my grandson Michael Custis the silver cup bought of his father. To Sarah Custis, the daughter of Thomas Custis, my gold chain. To son-in-law Hancock Custis negro woman Tandy and gold ring with the posey, "As true to thee as love can be." To my son-in-law Henry Custis all my livestock on Jenckotage Island. To my sister Elizabeth Waters 6 large flag chairs that came from New England. To Elizabeth, the daughter of my sister Elizabeth Waters. To my sister Gartrude Harmanson negro man Baccka, mulatto woman Chocoloat, and gold ring with a Virginia stone in it. To my kinswoman Sophia Harmanson mulatto girl Patience. To Littleton and Severn Eyre (sons of Severn) my two mulatto girls Hannah and Sunto when Severn is 18. To Leah Littleton, heir to Southy Littleton, 600 acres in Accomack Co at Pokemoke, land initially given to me by my father Col Littleton, taken up by my former husband Adam Michael dec'd and being by him given to me, and thence given to my dec'd brother Southy Littleton and his heirs by my late husband John Custis and myself by deed of gift. I confirm my deed to Henry Custis of 500 acres in Accomack at Masongue. I confirm my deed to George Harmanson of 50 acres adjoining the land whereon Henry Pike now lives. I confirm my deed for life to John Marshall, Jr and his wife Mary to 200 acres joyning to the aforesaid land given to John Harmanson. To my two kinsmen William and Southy Whittington. To my cousin Elizabeth Allen. To John Atkinson. To William Waters 15s. To Mr. John Ritchie, merchant, if he be living, £10 for mourning clothes, as per a former verbal bargain between us that the earliest to die should buy the other mourning clothes. To Sarah Nottingham widow. To my kinswoman Sarah Custis King negro man Peter, negro boy Parget and mulatto girl Amerilla; silver porringer, 6 new silver spoons and silver soup spoon. To kinswoman Esther Littleton negro man Trout and negro boys Hannibal and Gundamore, old silver porringer, 11 silver spoons, a new silver kan, and my horse "Trample." The above legacies to my kinswomen Sarah Custis King and Esther Littleton given with regard to their having made over their right to that tract of land lying at Anduay Creek in Accomack Co, lately in the possession of my late brother Southy Littleton, to my kinswoman Leah Littleton. To my kinswoman Leah Littleton my mulattoo man George Dallby and his two children Betty and Tamer, and also my negro man Robin, small silver tankard, 6 new silver spoons, new silver porringer and the Rushia leather trunk. To my kinswomen Sarah Custis King and Esther Littleton all my costs pertaining to a suit in this county: Sarah Custis King and Esther Littleton vs. Edward Mifflin. Residual legatees my sister Garthrud Harmanson and my kinswomen Sarah Custis King, Esther Littleton and Leah Littleton to be equally divided. My sister Garthrud Harmanson executrix, but if she should die then my three kinswomen above named to act as executors. Wittnesses: George Harmanson, William Tazewell, Andrew Ross, Benjamin [lost], Sarah Michael, John Atkinson, James [lost], Sorrowful Margaret Kendall, Elizabeth Church, Mary [lost], Eli[lost] [lost]hall.

Moody Miles detailed sources:

[S624] Virginia M. Meyer & John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, 3rd Edition.
[S940] John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 338 (Thorowgood Family).
[S570] Stratton Nottingham, Accomack Co, VA, Wills & Administrations, 1663-1800, p. 26 (will of Bowman Littleton).
[S497] James Handley Marshall, Northampton Co, VA, Abstracts of Wills & Administrations, 1632-1802, p. 203 (will of John Custis, Esq., wife Sarah); p. 231 (will of Sarah Custis, widow of John Custis & former husband Adam Michael); and p. 235 (will of William Kendall Sr., wife Sorrowful Margaret Kendall).

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Adam Michael1,2,3

M, ID# 353, (c 1660 - )
Father:CPT John Michael II (1st son John) (c 1630 - )
Mother:Elizabeth Thorowgood (1635 - 1675)
     Adam Michael was born c 1660 at Northampton Co, Virginia. He was the son of CPT John Michael II (1st son John) and Elizabeth Thorowgood. Adam Michael married Sarah Littleton, daughter of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman, c 1686. His estate was probated on 28 Nov 1689 at Northampton Co, Virginia.
      Capt Adam Michael lived at "Mount Custis," on Matomkin Beach, Northampton Co, VA. He bequeathed this home to his nephew John Michael. He apparently died without issue because he left his plantation to his nephews Hancock Custis, Henry Custis and James Watt.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S12] "Ella Virginia Auguste Perry (1870-1971) Research: Collection of hand-written Lanphier, Martin, Perry, Russell and Other Family Documents."
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Elizabeth Custis1

F, ID# 354, (c 1682 - c 1716)
Father:COL John Custis III (of Wilsonia) (1654 - 26 Jan 1713)
Mother:Margaret Michael (1658 - c 1692)
Charts:Margaret Custis Russell * lineage
     Elizabeth Custis was born c 1682 at Northampton Co, Virginia. She was the daughter of COL John Custis III (of Wilsonia) and Margaret Michael. Elizabeth Custis married Thomas Custis, son of Edmund Custis (of Deep Creek) and Tabitha Smart Whittington, c 1706. Elizabeth Custis died c 1716.

Children of Elizabeth Custis and Thomas Custis

Citations

  1. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Elizabeth Littleton1,2

F, ID# 355, (c 1671 - 1753)
Father:COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) (1642 - Sep 1679)
Mother:Sarah Bowman (c 1645 - b 1679)
     Elizabeth Littleton was born c 1671. She was the daughter of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman. Elizabeth Littleton married Richard Waters a 1691. Elizabeth Littleton died in 1753.
      Elizabeth Littleton Waters was a "trustee" of the Monie Meeting House and the Annemessex Meeting of Friends of the Quakers.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S35] William Clayton Torrence (1184-1953), Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore.

Richard Waters1

M, ID# 356, (a 1666 - )
     Richard Waters was born a 1666. He married Elizabeth Littleton, daughter of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman, a 1691. Richard Waters was buried at Somerset Co, Maryland.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."

Gertrude Littleton1,2

F, ID# 357, (c 1673 - )
Father:COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) (1642 - Sep 1679)
Mother:Sarah Bowman (c 1645 - b 1679)
     Gertrude Littleton was born c 1673. She was the daughter of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman. Gertrude Littleton married Henry Harmanson, son of Thomas Harmanson I (Burgess), c 1694 at Northampton Co, Virginia. Her estate was probated on 9 Jan 1737/38 at Northampton Co, Virginia.

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S14] Ellen Martin Research.

Girbergia (Unknown)1

F, ID# 358, (a 1026 - )
Father:Vuillelmus 'Hugo' de Vego (a 1001 - )
     Girbergia (Unknown) was born a 1026. She was the daughter of Vuillelmus 'Hugo' de Vego. Girbergia (Unknown) married Aschericus vel Asciricus, son of Eldinus (Unknown) and Bernardi (Unknown), a 1049.

Child of Girbergia (Unknown) and Aschericus vel Asciricus

Citations

  1. [S66] Benjamin Jones Dashiell (1867- ), Dashiell Family.

Nathaniel Littleton1,2,3

M, ID# 359, (c 1665 - 1703)
Father:COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) (1642 - Sep 1679)
Mother:Sarah Bowman (c 1645 - b 1679)
     Nathaniel Littleton was born c 1665 at Northampton Co, Virginia. He was the son of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman. Nathaniel Littleton married Susanna Andrews a 1690. Nathaniel Littleton died in 1703 at Virginia.

Children of Nathaniel Littleton and Susanna Andrews

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S160] George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial Families.
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."

Susanna Andrews1,2,3

F, ID# 360, (a 1670 - )
     Susanna Andrews was born a 1670. She married Nathaniel Littleton, son of COL Southy Littleton I (Burgess) and Sarah Bowman, a 1690.

Children of Susanna Andrews and Nathaniel Littleton

Citations

  1. [S3] "Elizabeth Harriet Perry Research."
  2. [S14] Ellen Martin Research.
  3. [S2] "Moody Miles Research."